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Title: Watershed Scale Optimization to Meet Sustainable Cellulosic Energy Crop Demand

Abstract

The overall goal of this project was to conduct a watershed-scale sustainability assessment of multiple species of energy crops and removal of crop residues within two watersheds (Wildcat Creek, and St. Joseph River) representative of conditions in the Upper Midwest. The sustainability assessment included bioenergy feedstock production impacts on environmental quality, economic costs of production, and ecosystem services.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
DOE-Purdue; USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Bioenergy Technologies Office (EE-3B)
OSTI Identifier:
1347997
Report Number(s):
DOE-Purdue-EE0004396
7654943258
DOE Contract Number:
EE0004396
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
09 BIOMASS FUELS; Bioenergy; switchgrass; Miscanthus; Hybrid Poplar; SWAT model

Citation Formats

Chaubey, Indrajeet, Cibin, Raj, Bowling, Laura, Brouder, Sylvie, Cherkauer, Keith, Engel, Bernard, Frankenberger, Jane, Goforth, Reuben, Gramig, Benjamin, and Volenec, Jeffrey. Watershed Scale Optimization to Meet Sustainable Cellulosic Energy Crop Demand. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1347997.
Chaubey, Indrajeet, Cibin, Raj, Bowling, Laura, Brouder, Sylvie, Cherkauer, Keith, Engel, Bernard, Frankenberger, Jane, Goforth, Reuben, Gramig, Benjamin, & Volenec, Jeffrey. Watershed Scale Optimization to Meet Sustainable Cellulosic Energy Crop Demand. United States. doi:10.2172/1347997.
Chaubey, Indrajeet, Cibin, Raj, Bowling, Laura, Brouder, Sylvie, Cherkauer, Keith, Engel, Bernard, Frankenberger, Jane, Goforth, Reuben, Gramig, Benjamin, and Volenec, Jeffrey. Fri . "Watershed Scale Optimization to Meet Sustainable Cellulosic Energy Crop Demand". United States. doi:10.2172/1347997. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1347997.
@article{osti_1347997,
title = {Watershed Scale Optimization to Meet Sustainable Cellulosic Energy Crop Demand},
author = {Chaubey, Indrajeet and Cibin, Raj and Bowling, Laura and Brouder, Sylvie and Cherkauer, Keith and Engel, Bernard and Frankenberger, Jane and Goforth, Reuben and Gramig, Benjamin and Volenec, Jeffrey},
abstractNote = {The overall goal of this project was to conduct a watershed-scale sustainability assessment of multiple species of energy crops and removal of crop residues within two watersheds (Wildcat Creek, and St. Joseph River) representative of conditions in the Upper Midwest. The sustainability assessment included bioenergy feedstock production impacts on environmental quality, economic costs of production, and ecosystem services.},
doi = {10.2172/1347997},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Mar 24 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Fri Mar 24 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Technical Report:

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