skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: DOE16R2-18c: A Suite of Ultra High-Temperature, High-Performance Components for Advanced Turbine Systems Based on Polymer-Derived Ceramics

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [2]
  1. Sporian Microsystems, Lafayette, CO (United States)
  2. Idea Scupltors, LLC, Longmont, CO (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sporian Microsystems, Lafayette, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
1347992
Report Number(s):
DOE-SMI-0015941
600-000-0470-00
DOE Contract Number:
SC0015941
Type / Phase:
SBIR
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
20 FOSSIL-FUELED POWER PLANTS; 36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; 42 ENGINEERING; Additive Manufacturing; Polymer-Derived Ceramics; High-Temperature

Citation Formats

Fish, Jason, Berard, Mary, Frediani, Laurel, Hotaling, Sam, Jensen, Alexis, Lubbers, Jon, Trentler, Tim, Wright, Lewis, and Mulhern, Brian. DOE16R2-18c: A Suite of Ultra High-Temperature, High-Performance Components for Advanced Turbine Systems Based on Polymer-Derived Ceramics. United States: N. p., 2017. Web.
Fish, Jason, Berard, Mary, Frediani, Laurel, Hotaling, Sam, Jensen, Alexis, Lubbers, Jon, Trentler, Tim, Wright, Lewis, & Mulhern, Brian. DOE16R2-18c: A Suite of Ultra High-Temperature, High-Performance Components for Advanced Turbine Systems Based on Polymer-Derived Ceramics. United States.
Fish, Jason, Berard, Mary, Frediani, Laurel, Hotaling, Sam, Jensen, Alexis, Lubbers, Jon, Trentler, Tim, Wright, Lewis, and Mulhern, Brian. Fri . "DOE16R2-18c: A Suite of Ultra High-Temperature, High-Performance Components for Advanced Turbine Systems Based on Polymer-Derived Ceramics". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_1347992,
title = {DOE16R2-18c: A Suite of Ultra High-Temperature, High-Performance Components for Advanced Turbine Systems Based on Polymer-Derived Ceramics},
author = {Fish, Jason and Berard, Mary and Frediani, Laurel and Hotaling, Sam and Jensen, Alexis and Lubbers, Jon and Trentler, Tim and Wright, Lewis and Mulhern, Brian},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Mar 24 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Fri Mar 24 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Technical Report:
This technical report may be protected. To request the document, click here.
Other availability
Please see Document Availability for additional information on obtaining the full-text document. Library patrons may search WorldCat to identify libraries that may hold this item. Keep in mind that many technical reports are not cataloged in WorldCat.

Save / Share:
  • The sintering kinetics of boron-doped SiC were studied in a high temperature dilatometer and discussed in terms of density and densification rate vs. temperature, time, sintering atmosphere, green density and initial crystallite size. A nitrogen furnace atmosphere was found to retard sintering and halt the Beta to alpha transformation. The fracture strength of sintered SiC was characterized in three-point bending as a function of powder processing technique, sintering atmosphere, density, and machining damage. The optimum powder processing included wet milling, screening (8 micrometers), spray freezing and freeze drying. Surface damage induced during machining could be 'repaired' by an appropriate thermalmore » treatment. The high temperature strength was measured in both bending and tension (theta tensile specimens) at 1600 C revealing exceptionally good resistance to subcritical crack growth. The response of sintered SiC to thermally induced stresses was tested by the 'Simulated Gas Turbine Environment Test' of NASA and the 'Glenny Thermal Fatigue Test.' Thermal stresses and probabilities of failure for the latter were computed by finite element analysis. (Author) (GRA)« less
  • A method for fabricating glass-bonded relaxing joints such as could be used on the ceramic tubes in heat exchangers under development for use with indirect fired gas turbines is discussed and evaluated. The theory of the relaxing joint concept and materials and processes for development of the concept are described. First specific silicate glass adhesives most suitable for silicon-based ceramic bonding, with particular emphasis on long-term joint reliability and functional stability (i.e., compatible with the relaxing joint concept) were tested. To facilitate the desired relaxing-joint function commercial glasses were chosen, or special glass adhesives were developed; each to provide anmore » initial range of viscosities of approximately 10/sup 10/ to 10/sup 8/ poise, at different intervals within the proposed joint service temperature range of 1250 to 2050/sup 0/F. The second endeavor was oriented toward solving major problems with joint processing, to make the relaxing joint concept practical. All of this program effort is described in detail. Recommendations are made for future work on establishing the very-long-term reliability of the joints and the physical characteristics of the joint materials. (LCL)« less
  • This research program built on the knowledge gained under past AFOSR support and focused on developing additional basic understanding of the relationships between ceramic product and corresponding polymer precursor structures, as a function of processing conditions. The primary objectives for this work were to: (1) demonstrate the use of silicon-based polymeric precursors as sources of nanostructured ceramic phases, including SiC, Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}, and SiC/AlN solid solutions; and (2) examine the ambient, as well as high temperature and high pressure behavior of these materials, including crystallization and polytype development, phase stability, densification and sintering characteristics. Poly(methylvinylsilane) converts to C-rich, nanocrystallinemore » beta-SiC during pyrolysis in argon, and the phase development is time and temperature dependent. Perhydropoly(silazane) provides a miscible source of elemental Si which effectively scavenges the excess C. Blends of the two polymers have increased ceramic char yields, and offer a source of SiC/Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} nanocomposites, especially near the stoichiometric ratio of excess Si to excess C. With blended polymers, crystal grain growth is inhibited below 1600 C and sub-stoichiometric ratios, but is enhanced at higher temperatures due to phase separation and decomposition of the perhydropoly(silazane). Poly(aluminosilazanes) are effective single-source polymer precursors to SiC/AIN ceramic products. The molecular-level distribution of Si, C, Al, and N present in the room temperature reaction product is retained in the ceramic. The Si/Al ratio in the starting polymer determines the extent of crystallinity in the ceramic phase. Both 4- and 6-coordinate Al are observed, depending on the starting reactant ratio.« less