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Title: Diverse data supports the transition of filamentous fungal model organisms into the post-genomics era

Abstract

As model organisms filamentous fungi have been important since the beginning of modern biological inquiry and have benefitted from open data since the earliest genetic maps were shared. From early origins in simple Mendelian genetics of mating types, parasexual genetics of colony colour, and the foundational demonstration of the segregation of a nutritional requirement, the contribution of research systems utilising filamentous fungi has spanned the biochemical genetics era, through the molecular genetics era, and now are at the very foundation of diverse omics approaches to research and development. Fungal model organisms have come from most major taxonomic groups although Ascomycete filamentous fungi have seen the most major sustained effort. In addition to the published material about filamentous fungi, shared molecular tools have found application in every area of fungal biology. Likewise, shared data has contributed to the success of model systems. Furthermore, the scale of data supporting research with filamentous fungi has grown by 10 to 12 orders of magnitude. From genetic to molecular maps, expression databases, and finally genome resources, the open and collaborative nature of the research communities has assured that the rising tide of data has lifted all of the research systems together.

Authors:
 [1];  [2]
  1. Kansas State Univ., Manhattan, KS (United States). Dept. of Plant Pathology
  2. Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States). Environmental Molecular Science Lab.
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1347959
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-129553
Journal ID: ISSN 2150-1203
Grant/Contract Number:
AC057601830
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Mycology
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 8; Journal Issue: 2; Journal ID: ISSN 2150-1203
Publisher:
Taylor & Francis
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; filamentous fungi; gene-for-gene hypothesis; bioprocessing; biotechnology; parasexual genetic maps; molecular markers; historical genetics

Citation Formats

McCluskey, Kevin, and Baker, Scott E. Diverse data supports the transition of filamentous fungal model organisms into the post-genomics era. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1080/21501203.2017.1281849.
McCluskey, Kevin, & Baker, Scott E. Diverse data supports the transition of filamentous fungal model organisms into the post-genomics era. United States. doi:10.1080/21501203.2017.1281849.
McCluskey, Kevin, and Baker, Scott E. Fri . "Diverse data supports the transition of filamentous fungal model organisms into the post-genomics era". United States. doi:10.1080/21501203.2017.1281849. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1347959.
@article{osti_1347959,
title = {Diverse data supports the transition of filamentous fungal model organisms into the post-genomics era},
author = {McCluskey, Kevin and Baker, Scott E.},
abstractNote = {As model organisms filamentous fungi have been important since the beginning of modern biological inquiry and have benefitted from open data since the earliest genetic maps were shared. From early origins in simple Mendelian genetics of mating types, parasexual genetics of colony colour, and the foundational demonstration of the segregation of a nutritional requirement, the contribution of research systems utilising filamentous fungi has spanned the biochemical genetics era, through the molecular genetics era, and now are at the very foundation of diverse omics approaches to research and development. Fungal model organisms have come from most major taxonomic groups although Ascomycete filamentous fungi have seen the most major sustained effort. In addition to the published material about filamentous fungi, shared molecular tools have found application in every area of fungal biology. Likewise, shared data has contributed to the success of model systems. Furthermore, the scale of data supporting research with filamentous fungi has grown by 10 to 12 orders of magnitude. From genetic to molecular maps, expression databases, and finally genome resources, the open and collaborative nature of the research communities has assured that the rising tide of data has lifted all of the research systems together.},
doi = {10.1080/21501203.2017.1281849},
journal = {Mycology},
number = 2,
volume = 8,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Feb 17 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Fri Feb 17 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}

Journal Article:
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