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Title: Turbulence Heating ObserveR – satellite mission proposal

Abstract

The Universe is permeated by hot, turbulent, magnetized plasmas. Turbulent plasma is a major constituent of active galactic nuclei, supernova remnants, the intergalactic and interstellar medium, the solar corona, the solar wind and the Earth’s magnetosphere, just to mention a few examples. Furthermore, energy dissipation of turbulent fluctuations plays a key role in plasma heating and energization, yet we still do not understand the underlying physical mechanisms involved.THOR is a mission designed to answer the questions of how turbulent plasma is heated and particles accelerated, how the dissipated energy is partitioned and how dissipation operates in different regimes of turbulence.THOR is a single-spacecraft mission with an orbit tuned to maximize data return from regions in near-Earth space – magnetosheath, shock, foreshock and pristine solar wind – featuring different kinds of turbulence. We summarize theTHOR proposal submitted on 15 January 2015 to the ‘Call for a Medium-size mission opportunity in ESAs Science Programme for a launch in 2025 (M4)’.THOR has been selected by European Space Agency (ESA) for the study phase.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [1];  [4];  [5];  [6];  [1];  [7];  [8];  [9];  [10];  [11];  [12];  [13];  [14];  [15];  [12];  [16];  [17] more »;  [18];  [1];  [19];  [20];  [21];  [22];  [23];  [24];  [25];  [26];  [18];  [27];  [28];  [29];  [1];  [1];  [30];  [31];  [32];  [13];  [33];  [2];  [4];  [34];  [35];  [28];  [36] « less
  1. Swedish Inst. of Space Physics, Uppsala (Sweden)
  2. Ecole Polytechnique Federale Lausanne (Switzlerland). Lab. of Plasma Physics
  3. Czech Academy of Sciences, Praha (Czech Republic). Inst. of Atmospheric Physics
  4. Univ. of Calabria, Rende (Italy). Dept. of Physics
  5. European Space Research and Technology Centre (ESTEC), Noordwijk (Netherlands)
  6. Laboratory for Space Studies and Instrumentation in Astrophysics (LESIA), Meudon (France)
  7. Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Physics Dept. and Space Sciences Lab.
  8. Univ. of Sheffield (United Kingdom). Dpet. of Automatic Control and Systems Engineering
  9. Queen Mary Univ. of London (United Kingdom). School of Physics and Astronomy
  10. Center for Mathematics and Computer Science (CWI), Amsterdam (Netherlands)
  11. Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Dept. of Astrophysical Sciences
  12. Imperial College, London (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physics
  13. OHB, Kista (Sweden)
  14. Univ. of Calgary, AB (Canada). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy
  15. Belgian Inst. for Space Aeronomy, Brussels (Belgium). Space Physics Division
  16. Univ. College of London (United Kingdom). Mullard Space Science Lab.
  17. Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States). Lab. for Atmosphieric and Space Physics
  18. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), Greenbelt, MD (United States)
  19. Max Planck Inst. for Solar System Research, Gottingen (Germany); Univ. of Bergen (Norway). Dept. of Physics and Technology
  20. Univ. of Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Earth and Planetary Science
  21. Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Dept. of Astrophysical Sciences. Dept. of Astrophyscial Science and Princeton Plasma Physics Lab.
  22. SciberQuest, Del Mar, CA (United States)
  23. Univ. of New Hampshire, Durham, NH (United States). Inst. for the Study of Earth, Oceans, and Space
  24. Univ. of Toulous (France). Inst. of Research in Astrophysics and Planetology; National Center for Scientific Research, Toulouse (France)
  25. INAF/IAPS, Rome (Italy)
  26. Univ. of Delaware, Newark, DE (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy
  27. Austrian Academy of Sciences, Graz (Australia). Space Research Inst.
  28. Austrian Academy of Sciences, Graz (Austria). Space Research Inst.
  29. Charles Univ., Prague (Czech Republic). Faculty of Mathematics and Physics
  30. Finnish Meteorological Inst., Helsinki (Finland). Earth Observation Unit
  31. European Space Agency, Science and Robotic Exploration Directorate, Madrid (Spain)
  32. LPC2E/CNRS, Orleans (France)
  33. Polish Academy of Sciences, Warsaw (Poland). Space Research Centre
  34. Nanotech/CNR, Rende (Italy)
  35. Univ. of Turku (Finland). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy
  36. Christian-Albrechts Univ., Kiel (Germany). Inst. of Experimental and Applied Physics
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1347920
Grant/Contract Number:
AC02-09CH11466
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Journal of Plasma Physics
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 82; Journal Issue: 05; Journal ID: ISSN 0022-3778
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
70 PLASMA PHYSICS AND FUSION TECHNOLOGY; plasma heating; plasma properties; space plasma physics

Citation Formats

Vaivads, A., Retinò, A., Soucek, J., Khotyaintsev, Yu. V., Valentini, F., Escoubet, C. P., Alexandrova, O., André, M., Bale, S. D., Balikhin, M., Burgess, D., Camporeale, E., Caprioli, D., Chen, C. H. K., Clacey, E., Cully, C. M., De Keyser, J., Eastwood, J. P., Fazakerley, A. N., Eriksson, S., Goldstein, M. L., Graham, D. B., Haaland, S., Hoshino, M., Ji, H., Karimabadi, H., Kucharek, H., Lavraud, B., Marcucci, F., Matthaeus, W. H., Moore, T. E., Nakamura, R., Narita, Y., Nemecek, Z., Norgren, C., Opgenoorth, H., Palmroth, M., Perrone, D., Pinçon, J. -L., Rathsman, P., Rothkaehl, H., Sahraoui, F., Servidio, S., Sorriso-Valvo, L., Vainio, R., Vörös, Z., and Wimmer-Schweingruber, R. F.. Turbulence Heating ObserveR – satellite mission proposal. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1017/S0022377816000775.
Vaivads, A., Retinò, A., Soucek, J., Khotyaintsev, Yu. V., Valentini, F., Escoubet, C. P., Alexandrova, O., André, M., Bale, S. D., Balikhin, M., Burgess, D., Camporeale, E., Caprioli, D., Chen, C. H. K., Clacey, E., Cully, C. M., De Keyser, J., Eastwood, J. P., Fazakerley, A. N., Eriksson, S., Goldstein, M. L., Graham, D. B., Haaland, S., Hoshino, M., Ji, H., Karimabadi, H., Kucharek, H., Lavraud, B., Marcucci, F., Matthaeus, W. H., Moore, T. E., Nakamura, R., Narita, Y., Nemecek, Z., Norgren, C., Opgenoorth, H., Palmroth, M., Perrone, D., Pinçon, J. -L., Rathsman, P., Rothkaehl, H., Sahraoui, F., Servidio, S., Sorriso-Valvo, L., Vainio, R., Vörös, Z., & Wimmer-Schweingruber, R. F.. Turbulence Heating ObserveR – satellite mission proposal. United States. doi:10.1017/S0022377816000775.
Vaivads, A., Retinò, A., Soucek, J., Khotyaintsev, Yu. V., Valentini, F., Escoubet, C. P., Alexandrova, O., André, M., Bale, S. D., Balikhin, M., Burgess, D., Camporeale, E., Caprioli, D., Chen, C. H. K., Clacey, E., Cully, C. M., De Keyser, J., Eastwood, J. P., Fazakerley, A. N., Eriksson, S., Goldstein, M. L., Graham, D. B., Haaland, S., Hoshino, M., Ji, H., Karimabadi, H., Kucharek, H., Lavraud, B., Marcucci, F., Matthaeus, W. H., Moore, T. E., Nakamura, R., Narita, Y., Nemecek, Z., Norgren, C., Opgenoorth, H., Palmroth, M., Perrone, D., Pinçon, J. -L., Rathsman, P., Rothkaehl, H., Sahraoui, F., Servidio, S., Sorriso-Valvo, L., Vainio, R., Vörös, Z., and Wimmer-Schweingruber, R. F.. 2016. "Turbulence Heating ObserveR – satellite mission proposal". United States. doi:10.1017/S0022377816000775. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1347920.
@article{osti_1347920,
title = {Turbulence Heating ObserveR – satellite mission proposal},
author = {Vaivads, A. and Retinò, A. and Soucek, J. and Khotyaintsev, Yu. V. and Valentini, F. and Escoubet, C. P. and Alexandrova, O. and André, M. and Bale, S. D. and Balikhin, M. and Burgess, D. and Camporeale, E. and Caprioli, D. and Chen, C. H. K. and Clacey, E. and Cully, C. M. and De Keyser, J. and Eastwood, J. P. and Fazakerley, A. N. and Eriksson, S. and Goldstein, M. L. and Graham, D. B. and Haaland, S. and Hoshino, M. and Ji, H. and Karimabadi, H. and Kucharek, H. and Lavraud, B. and Marcucci, F. and Matthaeus, W. H. and Moore, T. E. and Nakamura, R. and Narita, Y. and Nemecek, Z. and Norgren, C. and Opgenoorth, H. and Palmroth, M. and Perrone, D. and Pinçon, J. -L. and Rathsman, P. and Rothkaehl, H. and Sahraoui, F. and Servidio, S. and Sorriso-Valvo, L. and Vainio, R. and Vörös, Z. and Wimmer-Schweingruber, R. F.},
abstractNote = {The Universe is permeated by hot, turbulent, magnetized plasmas. Turbulent plasma is a major constituent of active galactic nuclei, supernova remnants, the intergalactic and interstellar medium, the solar corona, the solar wind and the Earth’s magnetosphere, just to mention a few examples. Furthermore, energy dissipation of turbulent fluctuations plays a key role in plasma heating and energization, yet we still do not understand the underlying physical mechanisms involved.THOR is a mission designed to answer the questions of how turbulent plasma is heated and particles accelerated, how the dissipated energy is partitioned and how dissipation operates in different regimes of turbulence.THOR is a single-spacecraft mission with an orbit tuned to maximize data return from regions in near-Earth space – magnetosheath, shock, foreshock and pristine solar wind – featuring different kinds of turbulence. We summarize theTHOR proposal submitted on 15 January 2015 to the ‘Call for a Medium-size mission opportunity in ESAs Science Programme for a launch in 2025 (M4)’.THOR has been selected by European Space Agency (ESA) for the study phase.},
doi = {10.1017/S0022377816000775},
journal = {Journal of Plasma Physics},
number = 05,
volume = 82,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 9
}

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