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Title: Assessing State-of-the-Art Capabilities for Probing the Atmospheric Boundary Layer: The XPIA Field Campaign

Abstract

The synthesis of new measurement technologies with advances in high performance computing provides an unprecedented opportunity to advance our understanding of the atmosphere, particularly with regard to the complex flows in the atmospheric boundary layer. To assess current measurement capabilities for quantifying features of atmospheric flow within wind farms, the U.S. Dept. of Energy sponsored the eXperimental Planetary boundary layer Instrumentation Assessment (XPIA) campaign at the Boulder Atmospheric Observatory (BAO) in spring 2015. Herein, we summarize the XPIA field experiment design, highlight novel approaches to boundary-layer measurements, and quantify measurement uncertainties associated with these experimental methods. Line-of-sight velocities measured by scanning lidars and radars exhibit close agreement with tower measurements, despite differences in measurement volumes. Virtual towers of wind measurements, from multiple lidars or dual radars, also agree well with tower and profiling lidar measurements. Estimates of winds over volumes,conducted with rapid lidar scans, agree with those from scanning radars, enabling assessment of spatial variability. Microwave radiometers provide temperature profiles within and above the boundary layer with approximately the same uncertainty as operational remote sensing measurements. Using a motion platform, we assess motion-compensation algorithms for lidars to be mounted on offshore platforms. Finally, we highlight cases that could be usefulmore » for validation of large-eddy simulations or mesoscale numerical weather prediction, providing information on accessing the archived dataset. We conclude that modern remote Lundquist et al. XPIA BAMS Page 4 of 81 sensing systems provide a generational improvement in observational capabilities, enabling resolution of refined processes critical to understanding 61 inhomogeneous boundary-layer flows such as those found in wind farms.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [2];  [2];  [5];  [3];  [6];  [7];  [8];  [3];  [3];  [7];  [9];  [6];  [6];  [6];  [7];  [2] more »;  [10];  [11];  [9];  [7];  [2];  [8];  [10];  [6];  [7];  [6];  [6];  [7];  [7];  [2];  [4];  [7] « less
  1. Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, University of Colorado Boulder, Boulder, and National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado
  2. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration/Earth System Research Laboratory, Boulder, Colorado
  3. The University of Texas at Dallas, Dallas, Texas
  4. Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences, University of Colorado Boulder, Boulder, Colorado
  5. National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado
  6. University of Maryland, Baltimore County, Baltimore, Maryland
  7. Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, University of Colorado Boulder, Boulder, Colorado
  8. Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas
  9. National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, Colorado
  10. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington
  11. College of Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Sciences, Oregon State University, Corvallis, Oregon
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1347869
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-115298
Journal ID: ISSN 0003-0007; WW0600000
DOE Contract Number:  
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society; Journal Volume: 98; Journal Issue: 2
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Lundquist, Julie K., Wilczak, James M., Ashton, Ryan, Bianco, Laura, Brewer, W. Alan, Choukulkar, Aditya, Clifton, Andrew, Debnath, Mithu, Delgado, Ruben, Friedrich, Katja, Gunter, Scott, Hamidi, Armita, Iungo, Giacomo Valerio, Kaushik, Aleya, Kosović, Branko, Langan, Patrick, Lass, Adam, Lavin, Evan, Lee, Joseph C. -Y., McCaffrey, Katherine L., Newsom, Rob K., Noone, David C., Oncley, Steven P., Quelet, Paul T., Sandberg, Scott P., Schroeder, John L., Shaw, William J., Sparling, Lynn, Martin, Clara St., Pe, Alexandra St., Strobach, Edward, Tay, Ken, Vanderwende, Brian J., Weickmann, Ann, Wolfe, Daniel, and Worsnop, Rochelle. Assessing State-of-the-Art Capabilities for Probing the Atmospheric Boundary Layer: The XPIA Field Campaign. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1175/BAMS-D-15-00151.1.
Lundquist, Julie K., Wilczak, James M., Ashton, Ryan, Bianco, Laura, Brewer, W. Alan, Choukulkar, Aditya, Clifton, Andrew, Debnath, Mithu, Delgado, Ruben, Friedrich, Katja, Gunter, Scott, Hamidi, Armita, Iungo, Giacomo Valerio, Kaushik, Aleya, Kosović, Branko, Langan, Patrick, Lass, Adam, Lavin, Evan, Lee, Joseph C. -Y., McCaffrey, Katherine L., Newsom, Rob K., Noone, David C., Oncley, Steven P., Quelet, Paul T., Sandberg, Scott P., Schroeder, John L., Shaw, William J., Sparling, Lynn, Martin, Clara St., Pe, Alexandra St., Strobach, Edward, Tay, Ken, Vanderwende, Brian J., Weickmann, Ann, Wolfe, Daniel, & Worsnop, Rochelle. Assessing State-of-the-Art Capabilities for Probing the Atmospheric Boundary Layer: The XPIA Field Campaign. United States. doi:10.1175/BAMS-D-15-00151.1.
Lundquist, Julie K., Wilczak, James M., Ashton, Ryan, Bianco, Laura, Brewer, W. Alan, Choukulkar, Aditya, Clifton, Andrew, Debnath, Mithu, Delgado, Ruben, Friedrich, Katja, Gunter, Scott, Hamidi, Armita, Iungo, Giacomo Valerio, Kaushik, Aleya, Kosović, Branko, Langan, Patrick, Lass, Adam, Lavin, Evan, Lee, Joseph C. -Y., McCaffrey, Katherine L., Newsom, Rob K., Noone, David C., Oncley, Steven P., Quelet, Paul T., Sandberg, Scott P., Schroeder, John L., Shaw, William J., Sparling, Lynn, Martin, Clara St., Pe, Alexandra St., Strobach, Edward, Tay, Ken, Vanderwende, Brian J., Weickmann, Ann, Wolfe, Daniel, and Worsnop, Rochelle. Wed . "Assessing State-of-the-Art Capabilities for Probing the Atmospheric Boundary Layer: The XPIA Field Campaign". United States. doi:10.1175/BAMS-D-15-00151.1.
@article{osti_1347869,
title = {Assessing State-of-the-Art Capabilities for Probing the Atmospheric Boundary Layer: The XPIA Field Campaign},
author = {Lundquist, Julie K. and Wilczak, James M. and Ashton, Ryan and Bianco, Laura and Brewer, W. Alan and Choukulkar, Aditya and Clifton, Andrew and Debnath, Mithu and Delgado, Ruben and Friedrich, Katja and Gunter, Scott and Hamidi, Armita and Iungo, Giacomo Valerio and Kaushik, Aleya and Kosović, Branko and Langan, Patrick and Lass, Adam and Lavin, Evan and Lee, Joseph C. -Y. and McCaffrey, Katherine L. and Newsom, Rob K. and Noone, David C. and Oncley, Steven P. and Quelet, Paul T. and Sandberg, Scott P. and Schroeder, John L. and Shaw, William J. and Sparling, Lynn and Martin, Clara St. and Pe, Alexandra St. and Strobach, Edward and Tay, Ken and Vanderwende, Brian J. and Weickmann, Ann and Wolfe, Daniel and Worsnop, Rochelle},
abstractNote = {The synthesis of new measurement technologies with advances in high performance computing provides an unprecedented opportunity to advance our understanding of the atmosphere, particularly with regard to the complex flows in the atmospheric boundary layer. To assess current measurement capabilities for quantifying features of atmospheric flow within wind farms, the U.S. Dept. of Energy sponsored the eXperimental Planetary boundary layer Instrumentation Assessment (XPIA) campaign at the Boulder Atmospheric Observatory (BAO) in spring 2015. Herein, we summarize the XPIA field experiment design, highlight novel approaches to boundary-layer measurements, and quantify measurement uncertainties associated with these experimental methods. Line-of-sight velocities measured by scanning lidars and radars exhibit close agreement with tower measurements, despite differences in measurement volumes. Virtual towers of wind measurements, from multiple lidars or dual radars, also agree well with tower and profiling lidar measurements. Estimates of winds over volumes,conducted with rapid lidar scans, agree with those from scanning radars, enabling assessment of spatial variability. Microwave radiometers provide temperature profiles within and above the boundary layer with approximately the same uncertainty as operational remote sensing measurements. Using a motion platform, we assess motion-compensation algorithms for lidars to be mounted on offshore platforms. Finally, we highlight cases that could be useful for validation of large-eddy simulations or mesoscale numerical weather prediction, providing information on accessing the archived dataset. We conclude that modern remote Lundquist et al. XPIA BAMS Page 4 of 81 sensing systems provide a generational improvement in observational capabilities, enabling resolution of refined processes critical to understanding 61 inhomogeneous boundary-layer flows such as those found in wind farms.},
doi = {10.1175/BAMS-D-15-00151.1},
journal = {Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society},
number = 2,
volume = 98,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Feb 01 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Wed Feb 01 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}