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Title: Multiresonant layered plasmonic films

Abstract

Multi-resonant nanoplasmonic films have numerous applications in areas such as nonlinear optics, sensing, and tamper indication. While techniques such as focused ion beam milling and electron beam lithography can produce high-quality multi-resonant films, these techniques are expensive, serial processes that are difficult to scale at the manufacturing level. Here, we present the fabrication of multi-resonant nanoplasmonic films using a layered stacking technique. Periodically-spaced gold nanocup substrates were fabricated using self-assembled polystyrene nanospheres followed by oxygen plasma etching and metal deposition via magnetron sputter coating. By adjusting etch parameters and initial nanosphere size, it was possible to achieve an optical response ranging from the visible to the near-infrared. Singly resonant, flexible films were first made by performing peel-off using an adhesive-coated polyolefin film. Through stacking layers of the nanofilm, we demonstrate fabrication of multi-resonant films at a fraction of the cost and effort as compared to top-down lithographic techniques.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington, United States
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1347838
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-120674
Journal ID: ISSN 1934-2608; 400809000
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Nanophotonics; Journal Volume: 11; Journal Issue: 1
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
nano; plasmonic; resonant; optical

Citation Formats

DeVetter, Brent M., Bernacki, Bruce E., Bennett, Wendy D., Schemer-Kohrn, Alan, and Alvine, Kyle J.. Multiresonant layered plasmonic films. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1117/1.JNP.11.016015.
DeVetter, Brent M., Bernacki, Bruce E., Bennett, Wendy D., Schemer-Kohrn, Alan, & Alvine, Kyle J.. Multiresonant layered plasmonic films. United States. doi:10.1117/1.JNP.11.016015.
DeVetter, Brent M., Bernacki, Bruce E., Bennett, Wendy D., Schemer-Kohrn, Alan, and Alvine, Kyle J.. Sun . "Multiresonant layered plasmonic films". United States. doi:10.1117/1.JNP.11.016015.
@article{osti_1347838,
title = {Multiresonant layered plasmonic films},
author = {DeVetter, Brent M. and Bernacki, Bruce E. and Bennett, Wendy D. and Schemer-Kohrn, Alan and Alvine, Kyle J.},
abstractNote = {Multi-resonant nanoplasmonic films have numerous applications in areas such as nonlinear optics, sensing, and tamper indication. While techniques such as focused ion beam milling and electron beam lithography can produce high-quality multi-resonant films, these techniques are expensive, serial processes that are difficult to scale at the manufacturing level. Here, we present the fabrication of multi-resonant nanoplasmonic films using a layered stacking technique. Periodically-spaced gold nanocup substrates were fabricated using self-assembled polystyrene nanospheres followed by oxygen plasma etching and metal deposition via magnetron sputter coating. By adjusting etch parameters and initial nanosphere size, it was possible to achieve an optical response ranging from the visible to the near-infrared. Singly resonant, flexible films were first made by performing peel-off using an adhesive-coated polyolefin film. Through stacking layers of the nanofilm, we demonstrate fabrication of multi-resonant films at a fraction of the cost and effort as compared to top-down lithographic techniques.},
doi = {10.1117/1.JNP.11.016015},
journal = {Journal of Nanophotonics},
number = 1,
volume = 11,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}
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