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Title: Lipidomics reveals dramatic lipid compositional changes in the maturing postnatal lung

Abstract

Lung immaturity is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in premature infants. Understanding the molecular mechanisms driving normal lung development could provide insights on how to ameliorate disrupted development. While transcriptomic and proteomic analyses of normal lung development have been previously reported, characterization of changes in the lipidome is lacking. Lipids play significant roles in the lung, such as dipalmitoylcholine in pulmonary surfactant; however, many of the roles of specific lipid species in normal lung development, as well as in disease states, are not well defined. In this study, we used liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) to investigate the murine lipidome during normal postnatal lung development. Lipidomics analysis of lungs from post-natal day 7, day 14 and 6-8 week mice (adult) identified 928 unique lipids across 21 lipid subclasses, with dramatic alterations in the lipidome across developmental stages. Our data confirmed previously recognized aspects of post-natal lung development and revealed several insights, including in sphingolipid-mediated apoptosis, inflammation and energy storage/usage. Complementary proteomics, metabolomics and chemical imaging corroborated these observations. Finally, this multi-omic view provides a unique resource and deeper insight into normal pulmonary development.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [2];  [2];  [1];  [3];  [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
  2. Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)
  3. Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States). Environmental Molecular Sciences Lab. (EMSL)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1347837
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-121148
Journal ID: ISSN 2045-2322; 49133; 48632; 453040220
Grant/Contract Number:
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Scientific Reports
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 7; Journal ID: ISSN 2045-2322
Publisher:
Nature Publishing Group
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; 59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory; lipidomics; organogenesis

Citation Formats

Dautel, Sydney E., Kyle, Jennifer E., Clair, Geremy, Sontag, Ryan L., Weitz, Karl K., Shukla, Anil K., Nguyen, Son N., Kim, Young -Mo, Zink, Erika M., Luders, Teresa, Frevert, Charles W., Gharib, Sina A., Laskin, Julia, Carson, James P., Metz, Thomas O., Corley, Richard A., and Ansong, Charles. Lipidomics reveals dramatic lipid compositional changes in the maturing postnatal lung. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1038/srep40555.
Dautel, Sydney E., Kyle, Jennifer E., Clair, Geremy, Sontag, Ryan L., Weitz, Karl K., Shukla, Anil K., Nguyen, Son N., Kim, Young -Mo, Zink, Erika M., Luders, Teresa, Frevert, Charles W., Gharib, Sina A., Laskin, Julia, Carson, James P., Metz, Thomas O., Corley, Richard A., & Ansong, Charles. Lipidomics reveals dramatic lipid compositional changes in the maturing postnatal lung. United States. doi:10.1038/srep40555.
Dautel, Sydney E., Kyle, Jennifer E., Clair, Geremy, Sontag, Ryan L., Weitz, Karl K., Shukla, Anil K., Nguyen, Son N., Kim, Young -Mo, Zink, Erika M., Luders, Teresa, Frevert, Charles W., Gharib, Sina A., Laskin, Julia, Carson, James P., Metz, Thomas O., Corley, Richard A., and Ansong, Charles. Wed . "Lipidomics reveals dramatic lipid compositional changes in the maturing postnatal lung". United States. doi:10.1038/srep40555. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1347837.
@article{osti_1347837,
title = {Lipidomics reveals dramatic lipid compositional changes in the maturing postnatal lung},
author = {Dautel, Sydney E. and Kyle, Jennifer E. and Clair, Geremy and Sontag, Ryan L. and Weitz, Karl K. and Shukla, Anil K. and Nguyen, Son N. and Kim, Young -Mo and Zink, Erika M. and Luders, Teresa and Frevert, Charles W. and Gharib, Sina A. and Laskin, Julia and Carson, James P. and Metz, Thomas O. and Corley, Richard A. and Ansong, Charles},
abstractNote = {Lung immaturity is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in premature infants. Understanding the molecular mechanisms driving normal lung development could provide insights on how to ameliorate disrupted development. While transcriptomic and proteomic analyses of normal lung development have been previously reported, characterization of changes in the lipidome is lacking. Lipids play significant roles in the lung, such as dipalmitoylcholine in pulmonary surfactant; however, many of the roles of specific lipid species in normal lung development, as well as in disease states, are not well defined. In this study, we used liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) to investigate the murine lipidome during normal postnatal lung development. Lipidomics analysis of lungs from post-natal day 7, day 14 and 6-8 week mice (adult) identified 928 unique lipids across 21 lipid subclasses, with dramatic alterations in the lipidome across developmental stages. Our data confirmed previously recognized aspects of post-natal lung development and revealed several insights, including in sphingolipid-mediated apoptosis, inflammation and energy storage/usage. Complementary proteomics, metabolomics and chemical imaging corroborated these observations. Finally, this multi-omic view provides a unique resource and deeper insight into normal pulmonary development.},
doi = {10.1038/srep40555},
journal = {Scientific Reports},
number = ,
volume = 7,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Feb 01 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Wed Feb 01 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}

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