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Title: Corrosion Experiments Using Spherical Uranium Powders

Abstract

Corrosion experiments using spherical U powders are continuing with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showing that the particles are highly textured, 5 m to 25 m diameters with 4% larger particles that are fused smaller particles. This U has a high specific surface area with no corners or back-sides, is well annealed with no machining work, and coated with a coherent oxide film, 30 nm to 300 nm thick. Exposure of this powder to low vapor pressure H 2O in the absence of O 2, i.e., a vacuum desiccator, resulted in a coherent oxide film growth of ~1 m/y, ~ 10X the growth rate in ambient air, displaying fracture along the growth plane at ~300 nm.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [2]
  1. Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
  2. Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant (Y-12), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1347519
Report Number(s):
Y/DZ-4009
DOE Contract Number:
NA0001942
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Hydrogen 2016, American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME), Moran, WY (United States), 9-12 Sep 2016
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE

Citation Formats

Powell, G. L., Siekhaus, W. J., and Teslich, N. E. Corrosion Experiments Using Spherical Uranium Powders. United States: N. p., 2017. Web.
Powell, G. L., Siekhaus, W. J., & Teslich, N. E. Corrosion Experiments Using Spherical Uranium Powders. United States.
Powell, G. L., Siekhaus, W. J., and Teslich, N. E. Wed . "Corrosion Experiments Using Spherical Uranium Powders". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_1347519,
title = {Corrosion Experiments Using Spherical Uranium Powders},
author = {Powell, G. L. and Siekhaus, W. J. and Teslich, N. E.},
abstractNote = {Corrosion experiments using spherical U powders are continuing with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showing that the particles are highly textured, 5 m to 25 m diameters with 4% larger particles that are fused smaller particles. This U has a high specific surface area with no corners or back-sides, is well annealed with no machining work, and coated with a coherent oxide film, 30 nm to 300 nm thick. Exposure of this powder to low vapor pressure H2O in the absence of O2, i.e., a vacuum desiccator, resulted in a coherent oxide film growth of ~1 m/y, ~ 10X the growth rate in ambient air, displaying fracture along the growth plane at ~300 nm.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Feb 01 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Wed Feb 01 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}

Conference:
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