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Title: A metastable liquid melted from a crystalline solid under decompression

Abstract

A metastable liquid may exist under supercooling, sustaining the liquid below the melting point such as supercooled water and silicon. It may also exist as a transient state in solid–solid transitions, as demonstrated in recent studies of colloidal particles and glass-forming metallic systems. One important question is whether a crystalline solid may directly melt into a sustainable metastable liquid. By thermal heating, a crystalline solid will always melt into a liquid above the melting point. Here we report that a high-pressure crystalline phase of bismuth can melt into a metastable liquid below the melting line through a decompression process. The decompression-induced metastable liquid can be maintained for hours in static conditions, and transform to crystalline phases when external perturbations, such as heating and cooling, are applied. It occurs in the pressure–temperature region similar to where the supercooled liquid Bi is observed. Finally, akin to supercooled liquid, the pressure-induced metastable liquid may be more ubiquitous than we thought.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1]; ORCiD logo [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Carnegie Institute of Washington, Argonne, IL (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Carnegie Inst. of Washington, Argonne, IL (United States); Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22); USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)
OSTI Identifier:
1347357
Grant/Contract Number:
FG02-99ER45775; NA0001974; FG02-94ER14466
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Nature Communications
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 8; Journal ID: ISSN 2041-1723
Publisher:
Nature Publishing Group
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; metals and alloys; structure of solids and liquids; phase transitions and critical phenomena

Citation Formats

Lin, Chuanlong, Smith, Jesse S., Sinogeikin, Stanislav V., Kono, Yoshio, Park, Changyong, Kenney-Benson, Curtis, and Shen, Guoyin. A metastable liquid melted from a crystalline solid under decompression. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1038/ncomms14260.
Lin, Chuanlong, Smith, Jesse S., Sinogeikin, Stanislav V., Kono, Yoshio, Park, Changyong, Kenney-Benson, Curtis, & Shen, Guoyin. A metastable liquid melted from a crystalline solid under decompression. United States. doi:10.1038/ncomms14260.
Lin, Chuanlong, Smith, Jesse S., Sinogeikin, Stanislav V., Kono, Yoshio, Park, Changyong, Kenney-Benson, Curtis, and Shen, Guoyin. Mon . "A metastable liquid melted from a crystalline solid under decompression". United States. doi:10.1038/ncomms14260. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1347357.
@article{osti_1347357,
title = {A metastable liquid melted from a crystalline solid under decompression},
author = {Lin, Chuanlong and Smith, Jesse S. and Sinogeikin, Stanislav V. and Kono, Yoshio and Park, Changyong and Kenney-Benson, Curtis and Shen, Guoyin},
abstractNote = {A metastable liquid may exist under supercooling, sustaining the liquid below the melting point such as supercooled water and silicon. It may also exist as a transient state in solid–solid transitions, as demonstrated in recent studies of colloidal particles and glass-forming metallic systems. One important question is whether a crystalline solid may directly melt into a sustainable metastable liquid. By thermal heating, a crystalline solid will always melt into a liquid above the melting point. Here we report that a high-pressure crystalline phase of bismuth can melt into a metastable liquid below the melting line through a decompression process. The decompression-induced metastable liquid can be maintained for hours in static conditions, and transform to crystalline phases when external perturbations, such as heating and cooling, are applied. It occurs in the pressure–temperature region similar to where the supercooled liquid Bi is observed. Finally, akin to supercooled liquid, the pressure-induced metastable liquid may be more ubiquitous than we thought.},
doi = {10.1038/ncomms14260},
journal = {Nature Communications},
number = ,
volume = 8,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 23 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Mon Jan 23 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}

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