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Title: Lithium Metal-Copper Vanadium Oxide Battery with a Block Copolymer Electrolyte

Abstract

Lithium (Li) batteries comprising multivalent positive active materials such as copper vanadium oxide have high theoretical capacity. These batteries with a conventional liquid electrolyte exhibit limited cycle life because of copper dissolution into the electrolyte. In this paper, we report here on the characterization of solid-state Li metal batteries with a positive electrode based on α-Cu 6.9V 6O 18.9 (α-CuVO 3). We replaced the liquid electrolyte by a nanostructured solid block copolymer electrolyte comprising of a mixture of polystyrene-b-poly(ethylene oxide) (SEO) and lithium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide (LiTFSI) salt. In situ X-ray diffraction was used to follow the Li insertion/de-insertion mechanism into the α-CuVO 3 host material and its reversibility. In situ X-ray scattering revealed that the multistep electrochemical reactions involved are similar in the presence of liquid or solid electrolyte. The capacity fade of the solid-state batteries is less rapid than that of α-CuVO 3–Li metal batteries with a conventional liquid electrolyte. Hard X-ray microtomography revealed that upon cycling, voids and Cu-rich agglomerates were formed at the interface between the Li metal and the SEO electrolyte. Finally, the void volume and the volume occupied by the Cu-rich agglomerates were independent of C-rate and cycle number.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3]; ORCiD logo [4];  [5];  [6];  [7]
  1. Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Joint Center for Energy Storage Research (JCESR) and Energy Technologies Area; Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering
  2. Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Sustainable Energy Technologies Department; Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States). Dept. of Chemistry
  3. Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Joint Center for Energy Storage Research (JCESR); Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering
  4. Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Advanced Light Source (ALS)
  5. Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States). Department of Chemistry
  6. Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Sustainable Energy Technologies Department
  7. Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Joint Center for Energy Storage Research (JCESR), Energy Technologies Area and Materials Science Division; Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
OSTI Identifier:
1347282
Report Number(s):
BNL-112701-2016-JA
Journal ID: ISSN 0013-4651
Grant/Contract Number:
SC00112704; AC02-05CH11231
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Journal of the Electrochemical Society
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 163; Journal Issue: 10; Journal ID: ISSN 0013-4651
Publisher:
The Electrochemical Society
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
25 ENERGY STORAGE; 36 MATERIALS SCIENCE

Citation Formats

Devaux, Didier, Wang, Xiaoya, Thelen, Jacob L., Parkinson, Dilworth Y., Cabana, Jordi, Wang, Feng, and Balsara, Nitash P. Lithium Metal-Copper Vanadium Oxide Battery with a Block Copolymer Electrolyte. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1149/2.1331610jes.
Devaux, Didier, Wang, Xiaoya, Thelen, Jacob L., Parkinson, Dilworth Y., Cabana, Jordi, Wang, Feng, & Balsara, Nitash P. Lithium Metal-Copper Vanadium Oxide Battery with a Block Copolymer Electrolyte. United States. doi:10.1149/2.1331610jes.
Devaux, Didier, Wang, Xiaoya, Thelen, Jacob L., Parkinson, Dilworth Y., Cabana, Jordi, Wang, Feng, and Balsara, Nitash P. 2016. "Lithium Metal-Copper Vanadium Oxide Battery with a Block Copolymer Electrolyte". United States. doi:10.1149/2.1331610jes. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1347282.
@article{osti_1347282,
title = {Lithium Metal-Copper Vanadium Oxide Battery with a Block Copolymer Electrolyte},
author = {Devaux, Didier and Wang, Xiaoya and Thelen, Jacob L. and Parkinson, Dilworth Y. and Cabana, Jordi and Wang, Feng and Balsara, Nitash P.},
abstractNote = {Lithium (Li) batteries comprising multivalent positive active materials such as copper vanadium oxide have high theoretical capacity. These batteries with a conventional liquid electrolyte exhibit limited cycle life because of copper dissolution into the electrolyte. In this paper, we report here on the characterization of solid-state Li metal batteries with a positive electrode based on α-Cu6.9V6O18.9 (α-CuVO3). We replaced the liquid electrolyte by a nanostructured solid block copolymer electrolyte comprising of a mixture of polystyrene-b-poly(ethylene oxide) (SEO) and lithium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide (LiTFSI) salt. In situ X-ray diffraction was used to follow the Li insertion/de-insertion mechanism into the α-CuVO3 host material and its reversibility. In situ X-ray scattering revealed that the multistep electrochemical reactions involved are similar in the presence of liquid or solid electrolyte. The capacity fade of the solid-state batteries is less rapid than that of α-CuVO3–Li metal batteries with a conventional liquid electrolyte. Hard X-ray microtomography revealed that upon cycling, voids and Cu-rich agglomerates were formed at the interface between the Li metal and the SEO electrolyte. Finally, the void volume and the volume occupied by the Cu-rich agglomerates were independent of C-rate and cycle number.},
doi = {10.1149/2.1331610jes},
journal = {Journal of the Electrochemical Society},
number = 10,
volume = 163,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 9
}

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