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Title: Lead isotopes in deep-sea coral skeletons: Ground-truthing and a first deglacial Southern Ocean record

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Nuclear Energy (NE)
OSTI Identifier:
1347242
Grant/Contract Number:
RPG-398
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Published Article
Journal Name:
Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 204; Journal Issue: C; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2018-01-02 04:30:31; Journal ID: ISSN 0016-7037
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Wilson, David J., van de Flierdt, Tina, and Adkins, Jess F. Lead isotopes in deep-sea coral skeletons: Ground-truthing and a first deglacial Southern Ocean record. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1016/j.gca.2017.01.052.
Wilson, David J., van de Flierdt, Tina, & Adkins, Jess F. Lead isotopes in deep-sea coral skeletons: Ground-truthing and a first deglacial Southern Ocean record. United States. doi:10.1016/j.gca.2017.01.052.
Wilson, David J., van de Flierdt, Tina, and Adkins, Jess F. Mon . "Lead isotopes in deep-sea coral skeletons: Ground-truthing and a first deglacial Southern Ocean record". United States. doi:10.1016/j.gca.2017.01.052.
@article{osti_1347242,
title = {Lead isotopes in deep-sea coral skeletons: Ground-truthing and a first deglacial Southern Ocean record},
author = {Wilson, David J. and van de Flierdt, Tina and Adkins, Jess F.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1016/j.gca.2017.01.052},
journal = {Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta},
number = C,
volume = 204,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Mon May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1016/j.gca.2017.01.052

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 1work
Citation information provided by
Web of Science

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  • A deep-sea coral was studied to determine its growth rate and to reconstruct time histories of isotope distributions in the deep ocean. The specimen was collected at a depth of 600 m off Little Bahama Banks using the Deep Submergence Vehicle (DSV) Alvin. The growth rate of the calcitic coral trunk was determined using excess {sup 210}Pb measured in concentric bands. Excess {sup 210}Pb was found in the outer half of the coral's radius, and a growth rate of 0.11 {plus minus} 0.02 mm/a is calculated. Assuming a constant growth rate during formation of the entire trunk, an age ofmore » 180 {plus minus} 40 a is estimated for the coral. The decrease observed in radiocarbon activities measured on the same bands (Griffin and Druffel, 1989) concurred with the growth rate estimated from excess {sup 210}Pb activity. {sup 239,240}Pu activities measured by mass spectrometry were also detected in the outer two bands of the coral, as expected from the {sup 210}Pb chronology. Stable oxygen and carbon isotopes measured in samples collected by a variety of techniques are positively correlated. This is evidence of a variable kinetic isotope effect most likely caused by variations in the skeletal growth rate. Long-lived corals such as this specimen have the potential for serving as integrators of seawater chemistry in the deep-sea over several century timescales.« less
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