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Title: Electric Power Generation from Low to Intermediate Temperature Resourcces

Abstract

The UND-CLR Binary Geothermal Power Plant was a collaborative effort of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Continental Resources, Inc. (CRL), Slope Electric Cooperative (SEC), Access Energy, LLC (AE), Basin Electric Cooperative (BEC), Olson Construction, the North Dakota Industrial Commission Renewable Energy Council (NDIC-REC), the North Dakota Department of Commerce Centers of Excellence Program (NDDC-COE), and the University of North Dakota (UND). The primary objective of project was to demonstrate/test the technical and economic feasibility of generating electricity from non-conventional, low-temperature (90 ºC to 150 °C) geothermal resources using binary technology. CLR provided the access to 98 ºC water flowing at 51 l s-1 at the Davis Water Injection Plan in Bowman County, ND. Funding for the project was from DOE –GTO, NDIC-REC, NDD-COE, and BEC. Logistics, on-site construction, and power grid access were facilitated by Slope Electric Cooperative and Olson Construction. Access Energy supplied prototype organic Rankine Cycle engines for the project. The potential power output from this project is 250 kW at a cost of $3,400 per kW. A key factor in the economics of this project is a significant advance in binary power technology by Access Energy, LLC. Other commercially available ORC engines have efficiencies 8 tomore » 10 percent and produce 50 to 250 kW per unit. The AE ORC units are designed to generate 125 kW with efficiencies up to 14 percent and they can be installed in arrays of tens of units to produce several MW of power where geothermal waters are available. This demonstration project is small but the potential for large-scale development in deeper, hotter formations is promising. The UND team’s analysis of the entire Williston Basin using data on porosity, formation thicknesses, and fluid temperatures reveals that 4.0 x 1019 Joules of energy is available and that 1.36 x 109 MWh of power could be produced using ORC binary power plants. Much of the infrastructure necessary to develop extensive geothermal power in the Williston Basin exists as abandoned oil and gas wells. Re-completing wells for water production could provide local power throughout the basin thus reducing power loss through transmission over long distances. Water production in normal oil and gas operations is relatively low by design, but it could be one to two orders of magnitude greater in wells completed and pumped for water production. A promising method for geothermal power production recognized in this project is drilling horizontal open-hole wells in the permeable carbonate aquifers. Horizontal drilling in the aquifers increases borehole exposure to the resource and consequently increases the capacity for fluid production by up to an order of magnitude.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [1]
  1. Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States)
  2. Chemical Engineering Department, University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Geothermal Technologies Office (EE-4G)
OSTI Identifier:
1347216
Report Number(s):
DE-EE0002854
DOE Contract Number:  
EE0002854
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
15 GEOTHERMAL ENERGY; Binary Power; Low Temperature Resources

Citation Formats

Gosnold, William, Mann, Michael, and Salehfar, Hossein. Electric Power Generation from Low to Intermediate Temperature Resourcces. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1347216.
Gosnold, William, Mann, Michael, & Salehfar, Hossein. Electric Power Generation from Low to Intermediate Temperature Resourcces. United States. doi:10.2172/1347216.
Gosnold, William, Mann, Michael, and Salehfar, Hossein. Mon . "Electric Power Generation from Low to Intermediate Temperature Resourcces". United States. doi:10.2172/1347216. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1347216.
@article{osti_1347216,
title = {Electric Power Generation from Low to Intermediate Temperature Resourcces},
author = {Gosnold, William and Mann, Michael and Salehfar, Hossein},
abstractNote = {The UND-CLR Binary Geothermal Power Plant was a collaborative effort of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Continental Resources, Inc. (CRL), Slope Electric Cooperative (SEC), Access Energy, LLC (AE), Basin Electric Cooperative (BEC), Olson Construction, the North Dakota Industrial Commission Renewable Energy Council (NDIC-REC), the North Dakota Department of Commerce Centers of Excellence Program (NDDC-COE), and the University of North Dakota (UND). The primary objective of project was to demonstrate/test the technical and economic feasibility of generating electricity from non-conventional, low-temperature (90 ºC to 150 °C) geothermal resources using binary technology. CLR provided the access to 98 ºC water flowing at 51 l s-1 at the Davis Water Injection Plan in Bowman County, ND. Funding for the project was from DOE –GTO, NDIC-REC, NDD-COE, and BEC. Logistics, on-site construction, and power grid access were facilitated by Slope Electric Cooperative and Olson Construction. Access Energy supplied prototype organic Rankine Cycle engines for the project. The potential power output from this project is 250 kW at a cost of $3,400 per kW. A key factor in the economics of this project is a significant advance in binary power technology by Access Energy, LLC. Other commercially available ORC engines have efficiencies 8 to 10 percent and produce 50 to 250 kW per unit. The AE ORC units are designed to generate 125 kW with efficiencies up to 14 percent and they can be installed in arrays of tens of units to produce several MW of power where geothermal waters are available. This demonstration project is small but the potential for large-scale development in deeper, hotter formations is promising. The UND team’s analysis of the entire Williston Basin using data on porosity, formation thicknesses, and fluid temperatures reveals that 4.0 x 1019 Joules of energy is available and that 1.36 x 109 MWh of power could be produced using ORC binary power plants. Much of the infrastructure necessary to develop extensive geothermal power in the Williston Basin exists as abandoned oil and gas wells. Re-completing wells for water production could provide local power throughout the basin thus reducing power loss through transmission over long distances. Water production in normal oil and gas operations is relatively low by design, but it could be one to two orders of magnitude greater in wells completed and pumped for water production. A promising method for geothermal power production recognized in this project is drilling horizontal open-hole wells in the permeable carbonate aquifers. Horizontal drilling in the aquifers increases borehole exposure to the resource and consequently increases the capacity for fluid production by up to an order of magnitude.},
doi = {10.2172/1347216},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Mar 20 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Mon Mar 20 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

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