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Title: NREL Evaluates Performance of Fast-Charge Electric Buses

Abstract

This real-world performance evaluation is designed to enhance understanding of the overall usage and effectiveness of electric buses in transit operation and to provide unbiased technical information to other agencies interested in adding such vehicles to their fleets. Initial results indicate that the electric buses under study offer significant fuel and emissions savings. The final results will help Foothill Transit optimize the energy-saving potential of its transit fleet. NREL's performance evaluations help vehicle manufacturers fine-tune their designs and help fleet managers select fuel-efficient, low-emission vehicles that meet their bottom line and operational goals. help Foothill Transit optimize the energy-saving potential of its transit fleet. NREL's performance evaluations help vehicle manufacturers fine-tune their designs and help fleet managers select fuel-efficient, low-emission vehicles that meet their bottom line and operational goals.

Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Communications and Outreach
OSTI Identifier:
1347100
Report Number(s):
NREL/FS-5400-67057
DOE Contract Number:
AC36-08GO28308
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
33 ADVANCED PROPULSION SYSTEMS; transportation; electric buses; buses; fuel; emissions; Foothill Transit; transit

Citation Formats

. NREL Evaluates Performance of Fast-Charge Electric Buses. United States: N. p., 2016. Web.
. NREL Evaluates Performance of Fast-Charge Electric Buses. United States.
. 2016. "NREL Evaluates Performance of Fast-Charge Electric Buses". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1347100.
@article{osti_1347100,
title = {NREL Evaluates Performance of Fast-Charge Electric Buses},
author = {},
abstractNote = {This real-world performance evaluation is designed to enhance understanding of the overall usage and effectiveness of electric buses in transit operation and to provide unbiased technical information to other agencies interested in adding such vehicles to their fleets. Initial results indicate that the electric buses under study offer significant fuel and emissions savings. The final results will help Foothill Transit optimize the energy-saving potential of its transit fleet. NREL's performance evaluations help vehicle manufacturers fine-tune their designs and help fleet managers select fuel-efficient, low-emission vehicles that meet their bottom line and operational goals. help Foothill Transit optimize the energy-saving potential of its transit fleet. NREL's performance evaluations help vehicle manufacturers fine-tune their designs and help fleet managers select fuel-efficient, low-emission vehicles that meet their bottom line and operational goals.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 9
}
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