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Title: Viscosity of mafic magmas at high pressures: VISCOSITY OF MAGMAS AT HIGH PRESSURES

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [2];  [3]; ORCiD logo [4]
  1. Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Université Paris 06, CNRS, Institut des Sciences de la Terre de Paris, Paris France; Scottish Universities Physics Alliance (SUPA), School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh UK
  2. Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Université Paris 06, CNRS, Institut des Sciences de la Terre de Paris, Paris France
  3. Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Université Paris 06, CNRS, Institut de Minéralogie, de Physique des matériaux et de Cosmochimie, Paris France
  4. HPCAT, Geophysical Laboratory, Carnegie Institution of Washington, Washington District of Columbia USA
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Advanced Photon Source (APS)
Sponsoring Org.:
DOE - BASIC ENERGY SCIENCESDOE-NNSAFOREIGN
OSTI Identifier:
1347014
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Geophysical Research Letters; Journal Volume: 44; Journal Issue: 2
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
ENGLISH

Citation Formats

Cochain, B., Sanloup, C., Leroy, C., and Kono, Y. Viscosity of mafic magmas at high pressures: VISCOSITY OF MAGMAS AT HIGH PRESSURES. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1002/2016GL071600.
Cochain, B., Sanloup, C., Leroy, C., & Kono, Y. Viscosity of mafic magmas at high pressures: VISCOSITY OF MAGMAS AT HIGH PRESSURES. United States. doi:10.1002/2016GL071600.
Cochain, B., Sanloup, C., Leroy, C., and Kono, Y. Sat . "Viscosity of mafic magmas at high pressures: VISCOSITY OF MAGMAS AT HIGH PRESSURES". United States. doi:10.1002/2016GL071600.
@article{osti_1347014,
title = {Viscosity of mafic magmas at high pressures: VISCOSITY OF MAGMAS AT HIGH PRESSURES},
author = {Cochain, B. and Sanloup, C. and Leroy, C. and Kono, Y.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1002/2016GL071600},
journal = {Geophysical Research Letters},
number = 2,
volume = 44,
place = {United States},
year = {Sat Jan 28 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Sat Jan 28 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}
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  • Techniques for measuring liquid structure, elastic wave velocity, and viscosity under high pressure have been integrated using a Paris–Edinburgh cell at Beamline 16-BM-B, HPCAT of the Advanced Photon Source. The Paris–Edinburgh press allows for compressing large volume samples (up to 2 mm in both diameter and length) up to ~7 GPa and 2000 °C. Multi-angle energy dispersive X-ray diffraction provides structure factors of liquid to a large Q of ~19 Å. Ultrasonic techniques have been developed to investigate elastic wave velocity of liquids combined with the X-ray imaging. Falling sphere viscometry, using high-speed X-ray radiography (>1000 frames/s), enables us tomore » investigate a wide range of viscosity, from those of high viscosity silicates or oxides melts to low viscosity (<1 mPa s) liquids and fluids such as liquid metals or salts. The integration of these multiple techniques has promoted comprehensive studies of structure and physical properties of liquids as well as amorphous materials at high pressures and high temperatures, making it possible to investigate correlations between structure and physical properties of liquids in situ.« less