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Title: A global database of nitrogen and phosphorus excretion rates of aquatic animals

Abstract

Though their importance varies greatly among species and ecosystems, animals can be important in modulating ecosystem-level nutrient cycling. Nutrient cycling rates of individual animals represent valuable data for testing the predictions of important frameworks such as the Metabolic Theory of Ecology (MTE) and ecological stoichiometry (ES). They also represent an important set of functional traits that may reflect both environmental and phylogenetic influences. Over the past two decades, studies of animal-mediated nutrient cycling have increased dramatically, especially in aquatic ecosystems. Here we present a global compilation of aquatic animal nutrient excretion rates. The dataset includes 10,534 observations from freshwater and marine animals of N and/or P excretion rates. Furthermore, these observations represent 491 species, including most aquatic phyla. Coverage varies greatly among phyla and other taxonomic levels. The dataset includes information on animal body size, ambient temperature, taxonomic affiliations, and animal body N:P. We used this data set to test predictions of MTE and ES, as described in Vanni and McIntyre (2016; Ecology DOI: 10.1002/ecy.1582).

Authors:
 [1]; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; more »; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; « less
  1. Miami University, Oxford, OH (United States). Department of Biology
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1346678
Grant/Contract Number:
AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Ecology
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 98; Journal Issue: 5; Journal ID: ISSN 0012-9658
Publisher:
Ecological Society of America (ESA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; nutrient cycling; excretion; fish; macroinvertebrates; ecological stoichiometry; animals; streams; lakes; rivers; aquatic; ecology

Citation Formats

Vanni, Michael J., McIntyre, Peter B., Allen, Dennis, Arnott, Diane L., Benstead, Jonathan P., Berg, David J., Brabrand, Åge, Brosse, Sébastien, Bukaveckas, Paul A., Caliman, Adriano, Capps, Krista A., Carneiro, Luciana S., Chadwick, Nanette E., Christian, Alan D., Clarke, Andrew, Conroy, Joseph D., Cross, Wyatt F., Culver, David A., Dalton, Christopher M., Devine, Jennifer A., Domine, Leah M., Evans-White, Michelle A., Faafeng, Bjørn A., Flecker, Alexander S., Gido, Keith B., Godinot, Claire, Guariento, Rafael D., Haertel-Borer, Susanne, Hall, Robert O., Henry, Raoul, Herwig, Brian R., Hicks, Brendan J., Higgins, Karen A., Hood, James M., Hopton, Matthew E., Ikeda, Tsutomu, James, William F., Jansen, Henrice M., Johnson, Cody R., Koch, Benjamin J., Lamberti, Gary A., Lessard-Pilon, Stephanie, Maerz, John C., Mather, Martha E., McManamay, Ryan A., Milanovich, Joseph R., Morgan, Dai K. J., Moslemi, Jennifer M., Naddafi, Rahmat, Nilssen, Jens Petter, Pagano, Marc, Pilati, Alberto, Post, David M., Roopin, Modi, Rugenski, Amanda T., Schaus, Maynard H., Shostell, Joseph, Small, Gaston E., Solomon, Christopher T., Sterrett, Sean C., Strand, Øivind, Tarvainen, Marjo, Taylor, Jason M., Torres-Gerald, Lisette E., Turner, Caroline B., Urabe, Jotaro, Uye, Shin-Ichi, Ventelä, Anne-Mari, Villeger, Sébastien, Whiles, Matt R., Wilhelm, Frank M., Wilson, Henry F., Xenopoulos, Marguerite A., and Zimmer, Kyle D.. A global database of nitrogen and phosphorus excretion rates of aquatic animals. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1002/ecy.1792.
Vanni, Michael J., McIntyre, Peter B., Allen, Dennis, Arnott, Diane L., Benstead, Jonathan P., Berg, David J., Brabrand, Åge, Brosse, Sébastien, Bukaveckas, Paul A., Caliman, Adriano, Capps, Krista A., Carneiro, Luciana S., Chadwick, Nanette E., Christian, Alan D., Clarke, Andrew, Conroy, Joseph D., Cross, Wyatt F., Culver, David A., Dalton, Christopher M., Devine, Jennifer A., Domine, Leah M., Evans-White, Michelle A., Faafeng, Bjørn A., Flecker, Alexander S., Gido, Keith B., Godinot, Claire, Guariento, Rafael D., Haertel-Borer, Susanne, Hall, Robert O., Henry, Raoul, Herwig, Brian R., Hicks, Brendan J., Higgins, Karen A., Hood, James M., Hopton, Matthew E., Ikeda, Tsutomu, James, William F., Jansen, Henrice M., Johnson, Cody R., Koch, Benjamin J., Lamberti, Gary A., Lessard-Pilon, Stephanie, Maerz, John C., Mather, Martha E., McManamay, Ryan A., Milanovich, Joseph R., Morgan, Dai K. J., Moslemi, Jennifer M., Naddafi, Rahmat, Nilssen, Jens Petter, Pagano, Marc, Pilati, Alberto, Post, David M., Roopin, Modi, Rugenski, Amanda T., Schaus, Maynard H., Shostell, Joseph, Small, Gaston E., Solomon, Christopher T., Sterrett, Sean C., Strand, Øivind, Tarvainen, Marjo, Taylor, Jason M., Torres-Gerald, Lisette E., Turner, Caroline B., Urabe, Jotaro, Uye, Shin-Ichi, Ventelä, Anne-Mari, Villeger, Sébastien, Whiles, Matt R., Wilhelm, Frank M., Wilson, Henry F., Xenopoulos, Marguerite A., & Zimmer, Kyle D.. A global database of nitrogen and phosphorus excretion rates of aquatic animals. United States. doi:10.1002/ecy.1792.
Vanni, Michael J., McIntyre, Peter B., Allen, Dennis, Arnott, Diane L., Benstead, Jonathan P., Berg, David J., Brabrand, Åge, Brosse, Sébastien, Bukaveckas, Paul A., Caliman, Adriano, Capps, Krista A., Carneiro, Luciana S., Chadwick, Nanette E., Christian, Alan D., Clarke, Andrew, Conroy, Joseph D., Cross, Wyatt F., Culver, David A., Dalton, Christopher M., Devine, Jennifer A., Domine, Leah M., Evans-White, Michelle A., Faafeng, Bjørn A., Flecker, Alexander S., Gido, Keith B., Godinot, Claire, Guariento, Rafael D., Haertel-Borer, Susanne, Hall, Robert O., Henry, Raoul, Herwig, Brian R., Hicks, Brendan J., Higgins, Karen A., Hood, James M., Hopton, Matthew E., Ikeda, Tsutomu, James, William F., Jansen, Henrice M., Johnson, Cody R., Koch, Benjamin J., Lamberti, Gary A., Lessard-Pilon, Stephanie, Maerz, John C., Mather, Martha E., McManamay, Ryan A., Milanovich, Joseph R., Morgan, Dai K. J., Moslemi, Jennifer M., Naddafi, Rahmat, Nilssen, Jens Petter, Pagano, Marc, Pilati, Alberto, Post, David M., Roopin, Modi, Rugenski, Amanda T., Schaus, Maynard H., Shostell, Joseph, Small, Gaston E., Solomon, Christopher T., Sterrett, Sean C., Strand, Øivind, Tarvainen, Marjo, Taylor, Jason M., Torres-Gerald, Lisette E., Turner, Caroline B., Urabe, Jotaro, Uye, Shin-Ichi, Ventelä, Anne-Mari, Villeger, Sébastien, Whiles, Matt R., Wilhelm, Frank M., Wilson, Henry F., Xenopoulos, Marguerite A., and Zimmer, Kyle D.. Mon . "A global database of nitrogen and phosphorus excretion rates of aquatic animals". United States. doi:10.1002/ecy.1792. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1346678.
@article{osti_1346678,
title = {A global database of nitrogen and phosphorus excretion rates of aquatic animals},
author = {Vanni, Michael J. and McIntyre, Peter B. and Allen, Dennis and Arnott, Diane L. and Benstead, Jonathan P. and Berg, David J. and Brabrand, Åge and Brosse, Sébastien and Bukaveckas, Paul A. and Caliman, Adriano and Capps, Krista A. and Carneiro, Luciana S. and Chadwick, Nanette E. and Christian, Alan D. and Clarke, Andrew and Conroy, Joseph D. and Cross, Wyatt F. and Culver, David A. and Dalton, Christopher M. and Devine, Jennifer A. and Domine, Leah M. and Evans-White, Michelle A. and Faafeng, Bjørn A. and Flecker, Alexander S. and Gido, Keith B. and Godinot, Claire and Guariento, Rafael D. and Haertel-Borer, Susanne and Hall, Robert O. and Henry, Raoul and Herwig, Brian R. and Hicks, Brendan J. and Higgins, Karen A. and Hood, James M. and Hopton, Matthew E. and Ikeda, Tsutomu and James, William F. and Jansen, Henrice M. and Johnson, Cody R. and Koch, Benjamin J. and Lamberti, Gary A. and Lessard-Pilon, Stephanie and Maerz, John C. and Mather, Martha E. and McManamay, Ryan A. and Milanovich, Joseph R. and Morgan, Dai K. J. and Moslemi, Jennifer M. and Naddafi, Rahmat and Nilssen, Jens Petter and Pagano, Marc and Pilati, Alberto and Post, David M. and Roopin, Modi and Rugenski, Amanda T. and Schaus, Maynard H. and Shostell, Joseph and Small, Gaston E. and Solomon, Christopher T. and Sterrett, Sean C. and Strand, Øivind and Tarvainen, Marjo and Taylor, Jason M. and Torres-Gerald, Lisette E. and Turner, Caroline B. and Urabe, Jotaro and Uye, Shin-Ichi and Ventelä, Anne-Mari and Villeger, Sébastien and Whiles, Matt R. and Wilhelm, Frank M. and Wilson, Henry F. and Xenopoulos, Marguerite A. and Zimmer, Kyle D.},
abstractNote = {Though their importance varies greatly among species and ecosystems, animals can be important in modulating ecosystem-level nutrient cycling. Nutrient cycling rates of individual animals represent valuable data for testing the predictions of important frameworks such as the Metabolic Theory of Ecology (MTE) and ecological stoichiometry (ES). They also represent an important set of functional traits that may reflect both environmental and phylogenetic influences. Over the past two decades, studies of animal-mediated nutrient cycling have increased dramatically, especially in aquatic ecosystems. Here we present a global compilation of aquatic animal nutrient excretion rates. The dataset includes 10,534 observations from freshwater and marine animals of N and/or P excretion rates. Furthermore, these observations represent 491 species, including most aquatic phyla. Coverage varies greatly among phyla and other taxonomic levels. The dataset includes information on animal body size, ambient temperature, taxonomic affiliations, and animal body N:P. We used this data set to test predictions of MTE and ES, as described in Vanni and McIntyre (2016; Ecology DOI: 10.1002/ecy.1582).},
doi = {10.1002/ecy.1792},
journal = {Ecology},
number = 5,
volume = 98,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Mar 06 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Mon Mar 06 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}

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