skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Detection of phosphate transporter genes from arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in mature tree roots under experimental soil pH manipulation

Abstract

We present the majority of terrestrial plant roots are colonized by arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi that, in exchange for carbon, provide plants with enhanced nutrient uptake — most notably inorganic phosphate (P i). To mediate the uptake of Pi from the soil, AM fungi possess high affinity inorganic phosphate transporters (PTs). Under laboratory conditions, P i concentrations have been shown to regulate AM fungal-specific PT gene expression. The relationship between PT expression and P i in the field remains unexplored. Here we quantify AM fungal-specific PTs from maple tree roots in situ. In an effort to limit edaphic parameters, root samples were collected from manipulated forested plots that had elevated soil P i availability, either through direct P i application or elevating pH to lower exchangeable aluminum. The aim of the study was to examine AM fungal-specific PT gene expression both prior to and following soil P i amendment; however, a direct correlation between soil P i concentration and PT gene expression was not observed. PT transcripts were detected to a greater extent under elevated pH and, while our results are confounded by an overall low detection of PT genes (23 % of all samples collected), our findings raise interestingmore » questions regarding the role of soil pH on PT function. In conclusion, our study is a first step in understanding how edaphic properties influence PT expression and plant P acquisition in mature tree roots.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [1]
  1. Holden Arboretum, Kirtland (United States); Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States). Dept. of Biology
  2. Holden Arboretum, Kirtland (United States); Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States). Dept. of Biology; Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Biosciences Division
  3. Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States). Dept. of Biology; North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States). Dept. of Biological Sciences
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1346660
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Symbiosis
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 72; Journal Issue: 2; Journal ID: ISSN 0334-5114
Publisher:
Springer
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; AM fungi; Inorganic phosphorus; Quantitative PCR

Citation Formats

Carrino-Kyker, Sarah R., Kluber, Laurel A., Coyle, Kaitlin P., and Burke, David J.. Detection of phosphate transporter genes from arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in mature tree roots under experimental soil pH manipulation. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1007/s13199-016-0448-1.
Carrino-Kyker, Sarah R., Kluber, Laurel A., Coyle, Kaitlin P., & Burke, David J.. Detection of phosphate transporter genes from arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in mature tree roots under experimental soil pH manipulation. United States. doi:10.1007/s13199-016-0448-1.
Carrino-Kyker, Sarah R., Kluber, Laurel A., Coyle, Kaitlin P., and Burke, David J.. Tue . "Detection of phosphate transporter genes from arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in mature tree roots under experimental soil pH manipulation". United States. doi:10.1007/s13199-016-0448-1. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1346660.
@article{osti_1346660,
title = {Detection of phosphate transporter genes from arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in mature tree roots under experimental soil pH manipulation},
author = {Carrino-Kyker, Sarah R. and Kluber, Laurel A. and Coyle, Kaitlin P. and Burke, David J.},
abstractNote = {We present the majority of terrestrial plant roots are colonized by arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi that, in exchange for carbon, provide plants with enhanced nutrient uptake — most notably inorganic phosphate (Pi). To mediate the uptake of Pi from the soil, AM fungi possess high affinity inorganic phosphate transporters (PTs). Under laboratory conditions, Pi concentrations have been shown to regulate AM fungal-specific PT gene expression. The relationship between PT expression and Pi in the field remains unexplored. Here we quantify AM fungal-specific PTs from maple tree roots in situ. In an effort to limit edaphic parameters, root samples were collected from manipulated forested plots that had elevated soil Pi availability, either through direct Pi application or elevating pH to lower exchangeable aluminum. The aim of the study was to examine AM fungal-specific PT gene expression both prior to and following soil Pi amendment; however, a direct correlation between soil Pi concentration and PT gene expression was not observed. PT transcripts were detected to a greater extent under elevated pH and, while our results are confounded by an overall low detection of PT genes (23 % of all samples collected), our findings raise interesting questions regarding the role of soil pH on PT function. In conclusion, our study is a first step in understanding how edaphic properties influence PT expression and plant P acquisition in mature tree roots.},
doi = {10.1007/s13199-016-0448-1},
journal = {Symbiosis},
number = 2,
volume = 72,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Oct 04 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Tue Oct 04 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record

Save / Share:

Works referenced in this record:

CLUSTAL W: improving the sensitivity of progressive multiple sequence alignment through sequence weighting, position-specific gap penalties and weight matrix choice
journal, January 1994

  • Thompson, Julie D.; Higgins, Desmond G.; Gibson, Toby J.
  • Nucleic Acids Research, Vol. 22, Issue 22, p. 4673-4680
  • DOI: 10.1093/nar/22.22.4673

Introducing mothur: Open-Source, Platform-Independent, Community-Supported Software for Describing and Comparing Microbial Communities
journal, October 2009

  • Schloss, P. D.; Westcott, S. L.; Ryabin, T.
  • Applied and Environmental Microbiology, Vol. 75, Issue 23, p. 7537-7541
  • DOI: 10.1128/AEM.01541-09