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Title: Transitioning the California Energy Commission Eligible Equipment List to a National Platform

Abstract

The Energy Commission called on the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL)'s Solar Technical Assistance Team to explore various pathways for supporting continued evolution of the list. NREL staff utilized the Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency (DSIRE), California Solar Initiative (CSI) data, and information from in-depth interviews to better understand the impact of a lack of an updated list and suggest potential solutions. A total of 18 people from state energy offices, rebate program administrators, utilities, national testing laboratories, private companies, nonprofit organizations, and the federal government were interviewed between July and September 2013. CSI data were analyzed to illustrate the monetary benefits of the algorithm behind calculating performance of PV modules included on the list. The primary objectives of this study are to: 1) Determine the impact of not maintaining the list, and 2) Explore alternatives to the State of California's maintenance of the list.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Solar Energy Technologies Office (EE-4S)
OSTI Identifier:
1346615
Report Number(s):
NREL/TP-7A40-68115
DOE Contract Number:
AC36-08GO28308
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
14 SOLAR ENERGY; 29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY, AND ECONOMY; California Energy Commission; DSIRE; California Solar Initiative; renewables

Citation Formats

Truitt, Sarah, Nobler, Erin, Krasko, Vitaliy, Blair, Nate, Kurtz, Sarah, Hillman, Daniel, and Studer, Daniel. Transitioning the California Energy Commission Eligible Equipment List to a National Platform. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1346615.
Truitt, Sarah, Nobler, Erin, Krasko, Vitaliy, Blair, Nate, Kurtz, Sarah, Hillman, Daniel, & Studer, Daniel. Transitioning the California Energy Commission Eligible Equipment List to a National Platform. United States. doi:10.2172/1346615.
Truitt, Sarah, Nobler, Erin, Krasko, Vitaliy, Blair, Nate, Kurtz, Sarah, Hillman, Daniel, and Studer, Daniel. Wed . "Transitioning the California Energy Commission Eligible Equipment List to a National Platform". United States. doi:10.2172/1346615. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1346615.
@article{osti_1346615,
title = {Transitioning the California Energy Commission Eligible Equipment List to a National Platform},
author = {Truitt, Sarah and Nobler, Erin and Krasko, Vitaliy and Blair, Nate and Kurtz, Sarah and Hillman, Daniel and Studer, Daniel},
abstractNote = {The Energy Commission called on the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL)'s Solar Technical Assistance Team to explore various pathways for supporting continued evolution of the list. NREL staff utilized the Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency (DSIRE), California Solar Initiative (CSI) data, and information from in-depth interviews to better understand the impact of a lack of an updated list and suggest potential solutions. A total of 18 people from state energy offices, rebate program administrators, utilities, national testing laboratories, private companies, nonprofit organizations, and the federal government were interviewed between July and September 2013. CSI data were analyzed to illustrate the monetary benefits of the algorithm behind calculating performance of PV modules included on the list. The primary objectives of this study are to: 1) Determine the impact of not maintaining the list, and 2) Explore alternatives to the State of California's maintenance of the list.},
doi = {10.2172/1346615},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Wed Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}

Technical Report:

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  • The United States Department of Energy (DOE), in accordance with its responsibility to encourage research and development in the energy area, awards grants of used energy-related laboratory equipment to universities and colleges and other nonprofit educational institutions of higher learning in the United States for use in energy-oriented educational programs in the life, physical and environmental sciences and engineering. Proposals for the grant of available equipment in this program should be submitted by eligible non-profit educational institution to the DOE Field Office responsible for the site where the specific equipment is known to be located.
  • This is a listing of energy related equipment available through the Energy-Related Laboratory Equipment Grant Program which grants used equipment to institutions of higher education for energy-related research. Information included is an overview of the program, how to apply for a grant of equipment, eligibility requirements, types of equipment available, and the costs for the institution.
  • The Fairchild Semiconductor Corporation, the Intel Corporation, and the Raytheon Company each have a facility located approximately 3 miles south of San Francisco Bay in Mountain View, California. The Intel and Raytheon facilities are on the National Priorities List (NPL) while the Fairchild facility is a proposed NPL site. Within the one-half square mile area containing the three sites, 37 potential and two inferred sources of contamination have been identified. The major contaminants for the three sites include trichloroethene, 1,1,1-trichloroethane, 1,1-dichloroethene, 1,2-dichloroethene, 1,1-dichloroethane, chloroform, tetrachloroethene, 1,2-dichlorobenzene, trichlorotrifluoroethane (Freon 113), and vinyl chloride. These contaminants are attributed to the sites andmore » have been found primarily in the ground water and subsurface soil on the sites and in ground water off the sites. Contaminant concentrations in surface soils were within the normal range of background values. Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) have been found in surface water west of the study area in Stevens Creek, an intermittent stream. The source of these contaminants is suspected to be treated ground water that has been pumped from the Fairchild and Raytheon sites and discharged to Stevens Creek under a permit.« less
  • The California Energy Commission presents its views on the critical energy issues for California in the next twenty years. The report includes the Commission's official electricity demand forecast and assessments of other energy demand growth. It compares demand to estimates of the potential contributions of conservation and various conventional and alternative energy supply projects. The report focuses on California's overdependence on oil and examines options for reducing petroleum use, particularly in the transportation sector. The result is a series of policy recommendations for directing public and private investments into a diversity of energy options and for spreading the benefits andmore » costs of these options broadly and fairly among California's citizens.« less
  • A study was performed to study various long term energy future for California. It analyzed types of changes in California residents' consumption habits and living patterns that occurred in the 1970s and then projected the energy consequences of those trends. A summary of the results was presented at the California Energy Commission meeting and a reprint of the transcript is presented in this report.