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Title: Mercury-pollution induction of intracellular lipid accumulation and lysosomal compartment amplification in the benthic foraminifer Ammonia parkinsoniana

Abstract

In this study, heavy metals such as mercury (Hg) pose a significant health hazard through bioaccumulation and biomagnification. By penetrating cell membranes, heavy metal ions may lead to pathological conditions. Here we examined the responses of Ammonia parkinsoniana, a benthic foraminiferan, to different concentrations of Hg in the artificial sea water. Confocal images of untreated and treated specimens using fluorescent probes (Nile Red and Acridine Orange) provided an opportunity for visualizing the intracellular lipid accumulation and acidic compartment regulation. With increased Hg over time, we observed an increased number of lipid droplets, which may have acted as a detoxifying organelle where Hg is sequestered and biologically inactivated. Further, Hg seems to promote the proliferation of lysosomes both in terms of number and dimension that, at the highest level of Hg, resulted in cell death. We report, for the first time, the presence of Hg within the foraminiferal cell: at the basal part of pores, in the organic linings of the foramen/septa, and as cytoplasmic accumulations.

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [2];  [1];  [3];  [3];  [3];  [3];  [3];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [4]
  1. Urbino Univ., Urbino (Italy)
  2. Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, MA (United States)
  3. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
  4. Chinese Academy of Sciences (China)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
1346610
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1324211
Grant/Contract Number:
AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Published Article
Journal Name:
PLoS ONE
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 11; Journal Issue: 9; Journal ID: ISSN 1932-6203
Publisher:
Public Library of Science
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; foraminifera; lipid; lysosome; mercury; Hg-pollution; cytoplasm; pollutants; vesicles; sea water; scanning electron microscopy; heavy metals

Citation Formats

Frontalini, Fabrizio, Curzi, Davide, Cesarini, Erica, Canonico, Barbara, Giordano, Francesco M., De Matteis, Rita, Bernhard, Joan M., Pieretti, Nadia, Gu, Baohua, Eskelsen, Jeremy R., Jubb, Aaron M., Zhao, Linduo, Pierce, Eric M., Gobbi, Pietro, Papa, Stefano, Coccioni, Rodolfo, and Hu, Yi. Mercury-pollution induction of intracellular lipid accumulation and lysosomal compartment amplification in the benthic foraminifer Ammonia parkinsoniana. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0162401.
Frontalini, Fabrizio, Curzi, Davide, Cesarini, Erica, Canonico, Barbara, Giordano, Francesco M., De Matteis, Rita, Bernhard, Joan M., Pieretti, Nadia, Gu, Baohua, Eskelsen, Jeremy R., Jubb, Aaron M., Zhao, Linduo, Pierce, Eric M., Gobbi, Pietro, Papa, Stefano, Coccioni, Rodolfo, & Hu, Yi. Mercury-pollution induction of intracellular lipid accumulation and lysosomal compartment amplification in the benthic foraminifer Ammonia parkinsoniana. United States. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0162401.
Frontalini, Fabrizio, Curzi, Davide, Cesarini, Erica, Canonico, Barbara, Giordano, Francesco M., De Matteis, Rita, Bernhard, Joan M., Pieretti, Nadia, Gu, Baohua, Eskelsen, Jeremy R., Jubb, Aaron M., Zhao, Linduo, Pierce, Eric M., Gobbi, Pietro, Papa, Stefano, Coccioni, Rodolfo, and Hu, Yi. Wed . "Mercury-pollution induction of intracellular lipid accumulation and lysosomal compartment amplification in the benthic foraminifer Ammonia parkinsoniana". United States. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0162401.
@article{osti_1346610,
title = {Mercury-pollution induction of intracellular lipid accumulation and lysosomal compartment amplification in the benthic foraminifer Ammonia parkinsoniana},
author = {Frontalini, Fabrizio and Curzi, Davide and Cesarini, Erica and Canonico, Barbara and Giordano, Francesco M. and De Matteis, Rita and Bernhard, Joan M. and Pieretti, Nadia and Gu, Baohua and Eskelsen, Jeremy R. and Jubb, Aaron M. and Zhao, Linduo and Pierce, Eric M. and Gobbi, Pietro and Papa, Stefano and Coccioni, Rodolfo and Hu, Yi},
abstractNote = {In this study, heavy metals such as mercury (Hg) pose a significant health hazard through bioaccumulation and biomagnification. By penetrating cell membranes, heavy metal ions may lead to pathological conditions. Here we examined the responses of Ammonia parkinsoniana, a benthic foraminiferan, to different concentrations of Hg in the artificial sea water. Confocal images of untreated and treated specimens using fluorescent probes (Nile Red and Acridine Orange) provided an opportunity for visualizing the intracellular lipid accumulation and acidic compartment regulation. With increased Hg over time, we observed an increased number of lipid droplets, which may have acted as a detoxifying organelle where Hg is sequestered and biologically inactivated. Further, Hg seems to promote the proliferation of lysosomes both in terms of number and dimension that, at the highest level of Hg, resulted in cell death. We report, for the first time, the presence of Hg within the foraminiferal cell: at the basal part of pores, in the organic linings of the foramen/septa, and as cytoplasmic accumulations.},
doi = {10.1371/journal.pone.0162401},
journal = {PLoS ONE},
number = 9,
volume = 11,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Sep 07 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Wed Sep 07 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1371/journal.pone.0162401

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 3works
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