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Title: A direct electron detector for time-resolved MeV electron microscopy

Abstract

The introduction of direct electron detectors enabled the structural biology revolution of cryogenic electron microscopy. Direct electron detectors are now expected to have a similarly dramatic impact on time-resolved MeV electron microscopy, particularly by enabling both spatial and temporal jitter correction. Here we report on the commissioning of a direct electron detector for time-resolved MeV electron microscopy. The direct electron detector demonstrated MeV single electron sensitivity and is capable of recording megapixel images at 180 Hz. The detector has a 15-bit dynamic range, better than 30-μmμm spatial resolution and less than 20 analogue-to-digital converter count RMS pixel noise. The unique capabilities of the direct electron detector and the data analysis required to take advantage of these capabilities are presented. The technical challenges associated with generating and processing large amounts of data are also discussed.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
1346528
Report Number(s):
SLAC-PUB-16932
Journal ID: ISSN 0034-6748
DOE Contract Number:
AC02-76SF00515
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Review of Scientific Instruments; Journal Volume: 88; Journal Issue: 3
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
47 OTHER INSTRUMENTATION; ACCPHY, INST

Citation Formats

Vecchione, T., Denes, P., Jobe, R. K., Johnson, I. J., Joseph, J. M., Li, R. K., Perazzo, A., Shen, X., Wang, X. J., Weathersby, S. P., Yang, J., and Zhang, D. A direct electron detector for time-resolved MeV electron microscopy. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4977923.
Vecchione, T., Denes, P., Jobe, R. K., Johnson, I. J., Joseph, J. M., Li, R. K., Perazzo, A., Shen, X., Wang, X. J., Weathersby, S. P., Yang, J., & Zhang, D. A direct electron detector for time-resolved MeV electron microscopy. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4977923.
Vecchione, T., Denes, P., Jobe, R. K., Johnson, I. J., Joseph, J. M., Li, R. K., Perazzo, A., Shen, X., Wang, X. J., Weathersby, S. P., Yang, J., and Zhang, D. Wed . "A direct electron detector for time-resolved MeV electron microscopy". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4977923. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1346528.
@article{osti_1346528,
title = {A direct electron detector for time-resolved MeV electron microscopy},
author = {Vecchione, T. and Denes, P. and Jobe, R. K. and Johnson, I. J. and Joseph, J. M. and Li, R. K. and Perazzo, A. and Shen, X. and Wang, X. J. and Weathersby, S. P. and Yang, J. and Zhang, D.},
abstractNote = {The introduction of direct electron detectors enabled the structural biology revolution of cryogenic electron microscopy. Direct electron detectors are now expected to have a similarly dramatic impact on time-resolved MeV electron microscopy, particularly by enabling both spatial and temporal jitter correction. Here we report on the commissioning of a direct electron detector for time-resolved MeV electron microscopy. The direct electron detector demonstrated MeV single electron sensitivity and is capable of recording megapixel images at 180 Hz. The detector has a 15-bit dynamic range, better than 30-μmμm spatial resolution and less than 20 analogue-to-digital converter count RMS pixel noise. The unique capabilities of the direct electron detector and the data analysis required to take advantage of these capabilities are presented. The technical challenges associated with generating and processing large amounts of data are also discussed.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4977923},
journal = {Review of Scientific Instruments},
number = 3,
volume = 88,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Wed Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}
  • The introduction of direct electron detectors enabled the structural biology revolution of cryogenic electron microscopy. Direct electron detectors are now expected to have a similarly dramatic impact on time-resolved MeV electron microscopy, particularly by enabling both spatial and temporal jitter correction. Here in this paper, we report on the commissioning of a direct electron detector for time-resolved MeV electron microscopy. The direct electron detector demonstrated MeV single electron sensitivity and is capable of recording megapixel images at 180 Hz. The detector has a 15-bit dynamic range, better than 30-μm spatial resolution and less than 20 analogue-to-digital converter count RMS pixelmore » noise. The unique capabilities of the direct electron detector and the data analysis required to take advantage of these capabilities are presented. The technical challenges associated with generating and processing large amounts of data are also discussed.« less
  • Much effort has been devoted to the development of techniques to probe carrier dynamics, which govern many semiconductor device characteristics. We report direct imaging of electron dynamics on semiconductor surfaces by time-resolved photoemission electron microscopy using femtosecond laser pulses. The experiments utilized a variable-repetition-rate femtosecond laser system to suppress sample charging problems. The recombination of photogenerated electrons and the lateral motion of the electrons driven by an external electric field on a GaAs surface were visualized. The mobility was estimated from a linear relationship between the drift velocity and the potential gradient.
  • Previous measurements of triton burnup in deuterium tokamak plasmas show an anomalously small burnup for low-q-italic discharges with significant magnetohydrodynamic activity. This may have important implications for alpha particle burnup in a fusion reactor. By developing a detector capable of time-resolved 14-MeV neutron measurements, it should be possible to separate triton confinement and slowdown anomalies. We are testing lithium-free glass scintillators which would observe 14-MeV neutrons through prompt /sup 28/Si(n-italic, p-italic) /sup 28/Al reactions. These detectors are not sensitive to the much larger 2.5-MeV neutron background and should also have less sensitivity to the large thermal neutron background when comparedmore » to conventional /sup 6/Li-depleted glasses. Measurements of detector sensitivity to signal and potential background sources are being performed using a 14-MeV neutron source and radioactive sources. The expected signal behavior under various DIII-D plasma and beam conditions will also be presented.« less
  • A new method for investigating dynamic processes in transmission electron microscopy is proposed and demonstrated for Lorentz microscopy measurement of vortex motion in a Nb thin film. A selected portion of the electron beam current, modulated by the dynamics of the specimen, is led through the probe aperture at the image plane and measured as sequential counts of electrons or as a correlation function. The free energy barrier of the vortex hopping and the local creeping velocity are determined. In addition, the feasibility of observing the elastic flow of vortices is shown. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}