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Title: Production of hydrogen driven from biomass waste to power Remote areas away from the electric grid utilizing fuel cells and internal combustion engines vehicles

Abstract

Recent concerns over the security and reliability of the world’s energy supply has caused a flux towards the research and development of renewable sources. A leading renewable source has been found in the biomass gasification of biological materials derived from organic matters such as wood chips, forest debris, and farm waste that are found in abundance in the USA. Accordingly, there is a very strong interest worldwide in the development of new technologies that provide an in-depth understanding of this economically viable energy source. This work aims to allow the coupling of biomass gasification and fuel cell systems as well as Internal Combustion Engines (ICE) to produce high-energy efficiency, clean environmental performance and near-zero greenhouse gas emissions. Biomass gasification is a process, which produces synthesis gas (syngas) that contains 19% hydrogen and 20% carbon monoxide from inexpensive organic matter waste. This project main goal is to provide cost effective energy to the public utilizing remote farms’ waste and landfill recycling area.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Farmingdale State College, NY (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Farmingdale State College, NY (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)
OSTI Identifier:
1346405
Report Number(s):
DE-EE0003228
DE-EE0003228
DOE Contract Number:
EE0003228
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
08 HYDROGEN; Hydrogen; Biomass; waste; Gasification; Fuel cell; Electric Grid

Citation Formats

Tawfik, Hazem. Production of hydrogen driven from biomass waste to power Remote areas away from the electric grid utilizing fuel cells and internal combustion engines vehicles. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1346405.
Tawfik, Hazem. Production of hydrogen driven from biomass waste to power Remote areas away from the electric grid utilizing fuel cells and internal combustion engines vehicles. United States. doi:10.2172/1346405.
Tawfik, Hazem. Fri . "Production of hydrogen driven from biomass waste to power Remote areas away from the electric grid utilizing fuel cells and internal combustion engines vehicles". United States. doi:10.2172/1346405. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1346405.
@article{osti_1346405,
title = {Production of hydrogen driven from biomass waste to power Remote areas away from the electric grid utilizing fuel cells and internal combustion engines vehicles},
author = {Tawfik, Hazem},
abstractNote = {Recent concerns over the security and reliability of the world’s energy supply has caused a flux towards the research and development of renewable sources. A leading renewable source has been found in the biomass gasification of biological materials derived from organic matters such as wood chips, forest debris, and farm waste that are found in abundance in the USA. Accordingly, there is a very strong interest worldwide in the development of new technologies that provide an in-depth understanding of this economically viable energy source. This work aims to allow the coupling of biomass gasification and fuel cell systems as well as Internal Combustion Engines (ICE) to produce high-energy efficiency, clean environmental performance and near-zero greenhouse gas emissions. Biomass gasification is a process, which produces synthesis gas (syngas) that contains 19% hydrogen and 20% carbon monoxide from inexpensive organic matter waste. This project main goal is to provide cost effective energy to the public utilizing remote farms’ waste and landfill recycling area.},
doi = {10.2172/1346405},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Mar 10 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Fri Mar 10 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}

Technical Report:

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  • Recent advances in hydrogen fuel cell and internal combustion engine technologies have enabled new energy options for supplying electrical power in remote, off-grid areas. The objective of this investigation is to determine under which conditions wind turbines and PV systems can feasibly power electrolyzers to generate and store hydrogen for remote power generation using fuel cells and internal combustion engines. In this study, the optimization software HOMER is used to analyze a small 356-W radio repeater station and a 148-kW village power system. This study concludes that fuel cell systems appear competitive today at the radio repeater station and appearmore » competitive in the village system if fuel cell prices are reduced to 40% of their current capital cost.« less