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Title: Functional remediation components: A conceptual method of evaluating the effects of remediation on risks to ecological receptors

Abstract

Governmental agencies, regulators, health professionals, tribal leaders, and the public are faced with understanding and evaluating the effects of cleanup activities on species, populations, and ecosystems. While engineers and managers understand the processes involved in different remediation types such as capping, pump and treat, and natural attenuation, there is often a disconnect between (1) how ecologists view the influence of different types of remediation, (2) how the public perceives them, and (3) how engineers understand them. The overall goal of the present investigation was to define the components of remediation types (= functional remediation). Objectives were to (1) define and describe functional components of remediation, regardless of the remediation type, (2) provide examples of each functional remediation component, and (3) explore potential effects of functional remediation components in the post-cleanup phase that may involve continued monitoring and assessment. Functional remediation components include types, numbers, and intensity of people, trucks, heavy equipment, pipes, and drill holes, among others. Several components may be involved in each remediation type, and each results in ecological effects, ranging from trampling of plants, to spreading invasive species, to disturbing rare species, and to creating fragmented habitats. In some cases remediation may exert a greater effect onmore » ecological receptors than leaving the limited contamination in place. A goal of this conceptualization is to break down functional components of remediation such that managers, regulators, and the public might assess the effects of timing, extent, and duration of different remediation options on ecological systems.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1346293
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-119690
Journal ID: ISSN 1528-7394; 830403000
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Toxicology and Environmental Health: Part A; Journal Volume: 79; Journal Issue: 21
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; ecological receptors; Remediation Analysis; CRESP

Citation Formats

Burger, Joanna, Gochfeld, Michael, Bunn, Amoret, Downs, Janelle, Jeitner, Christian, Pittfield, Taryn, and Salisbury, Jennifer. Functional remediation components: A conceptual method of evaluating the effects of remediation on risks to ecological receptors. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1080/15287394.2016.1201026.
Burger, Joanna, Gochfeld, Michael, Bunn, Amoret, Downs, Janelle, Jeitner, Christian, Pittfield, Taryn, & Salisbury, Jennifer. Functional remediation components: A conceptual method of evaluating the effects of remediation on risks to ecological receptors. United States. doi:10.1080/15287394.2016.1201026.
Burger, Joanna, Gochfeld, Michael, Bunn, Amoret, Downs, Janelle, Jeitner, Christian, Pittfield, Taryn, and Salisbury, Jennifer. 2016. "Functional remediation components: A conceptual method of evaluating the effects of remediation on risks to ecological receptors". United States. doi:10.1080/15287394.2016.1201026.
@article{osti_1346293,
title = {Functional remediation components: A conceptual method of evaluating the effects of remediation on risks to ecological receptors},
author = {Burger, Joanna and Gochfeld, Michael and Bunn, Amoret and Downs, Janelle and Jeitner, Christian and Pittfield, Taryn and Salisbury, Jennifer},
abstractNote = {Governmental agencies, regulators, health professionals, tribal leaders, and the public are faced with understanding and evaluating the effects of cleanup activities on species, populations, and ecosystems. While engineers and managers understand the processes involved in different remediation types such as capping, pump and treat, and natural attenuation, there is often a disconnect between (1) how ecologists view the influence of different types of remediation, (2) how the public perceives them, and (3) how engineers understand them. The overall goal of the present investigation was to define the components of remediation types (= functional remediation). Objectives were to (1) define and describe functional components of remediation, regardless of the remediation type, (2) provide examples of each functional remediation component, and (3) explore potential effects of functional remediation components in the post-cleanup phase that may involve continued monitoring and assessment. Functional remediation components include types, numbers, and intensity of people, trucks, heavy equipment, pipes, and drill holes, among others. Several components may be involved in each remediation type, and each results in ecological effects, ranging from trampling of plants, to spreading invasive species, to disturbing rare species, and to creating fragmented habitats. In some cases remediation may exert a greater effect on ecological receptors than leaving the limited contamination in place. A goal of this conceptualization is to break down functional components of remediation such that managers, regulators, and the public might assess the effects of timing, extent, and duration of different remediation options on ecological systems.},
doi = {10.1080/15287394.2016.1201026},
journal = {Journal of Toxicology and Environmental Health: Part A},
number = 21,
volume = 79,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 8
}
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