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Title: Liquid Surface X-ray Studies of Gold Nanoparticle–Phospholipid Films at the Air/Water Interface

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Advanced Photon Source (APS)
Sponsoring Org.:
National Science Foundation (NSF)
OSTI Identifier:
1346217
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Physical Chemistry. B, Condensed Matter, Materials, Surfaces, Interfaces and Biophysical Chemistry; Journal Volume: 120; Journal Issue: 34
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
ENGLISH

Citation Formats

You, Siheng Sean, Heffern, Charles T. R., Dai, Yeling, Meron, Mati, Henderson, J. Michael, Bu, Wei, Xie, Wenyi, Lee, Ka Yee C., and Lin, Binhua. Liquid Surface X-ray Studies of Gold Nanoparticle–Phospholipid Films at the Air/Water Interface. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1021/acs.jpcb.6b03734.
You, Siheng Sean, Heffern, Charles T. R., Dai, Yeling, Meron, Mati, Henderson, J. Michael, Bu, Wei, Xie, Wenyi, Lee, Ka Yee C., & Lin, Binhua. Liquid Surface X-ray Studies of Gold Nanoparticle–Phospholipid Films at the Air/Water Interface. United States. doi:10.1021/acs.jpcb.6b03734.
You, Siheng Sean, Heffern, Charles T. R., Dai, Yeling, Meron, Mati, Henderson, J. Michael, Bu, Wei, Xie, Wenyi, Lee, Ka Yee C., and Lin, Binhua. 2016. "Liquid Surface X-ray Studies of Gold Nanoparticle–Phospholipid Films at the Air/Water Interface". United States. doi:10.1021/acs.jpcb.6b03734.
@article{osti_1346217,
title = {Liquid Surface X-ray Studies of Gold Nanoparticle–Phospholipid Films at the Air/Water Interface},
author = {You, Siheng Sean and Heffern, Charles T. R. and Dai, Yeling and Meron, Mati and Henderson, J. Michael and Bu, Wei and Xie, Wenyi and Lee, Ka Yee C. and Lin, Binhua},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1021/acs.jpcb.6b03734},
journal = {Journal of Physical Chemistry. B, Condensed Matter, Materials, Surfaces, Interfaces and Biophysical Chemistry},
number = 34,
volume = 120,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 9
}
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