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Title: Miniature, mobile X-ray computed radiography system

Abstract

A miniature, portable x-ray system may be configured to scan images stored on a phosphor. A flash circuit may be configured to project red light onto a phosphor and receive blue light from the phosphor. A digital monochrome camera may be configured to receive the blue light to capture an article near the phosphor.

Inventors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1346044
Patent Number(s):
9,588,234
Application Number:
14/258,481
Assignee:
Los Alamos National Security, LLC LANL
DOE Contract Number:
AC52-06NA25396
Resource Type:
Patent
Resource Relation:
Patent File Date: 2014 Apr 22
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
46 INSTRUMENTATION RELATED TO NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY; 36 MATERIALS SCIENCE

Citation Formats

Watson, Scott A, and Rose, Evan A. Miniature, mobile X-ray computed radiography system. United States: N. p., 2017. Web.
Watson, Scott A, & Rose, Evan A. Miniature, mobile X-ray computed radiography system. United States.
Watson, Scott A, and Rose, Evan A. Tue . "Miniature, mobile X-ray computed radiography system". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1346044.
@article{osti_1346044,
title = {Miniature, mobile X-ray computed radiography system},
author = {Watson, Scott A and Rose, Evan A},
abstractNote = {A miniature, portable x-ray system may be configured to scan images stored on a phosphor. A flash circuit may be configured to project red light onto a phosphor and receive blue light from the phosphor. A digital monochrome camera may be configured to receive the blue light to capture an article near the phosphor.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Mar 07 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Tue Mar 07 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}

Patent:

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  • In an exemplary embodiment, a radiation detector for receiving the radiation emerging from the radiography subject delivers electrical output signals corresponding to the received radiation profile, generating a relative movement between the support device and the radiation beam, and with a measurand converter and a video unit for the formation of the x-ray shadow image. The radiation detector is an x-ray image intensifier with an outletconnected television camera. A cancellation device is present which cancels the formation in the target region which is disposed immediately before the line image in the direction of movement of the line image, generated bymore » the x-ray beam, on the target. The effect of the stray radiation on the image quality is thereby eliminated.« less
  • A radiograph system with an anode plate, a cathode plate, and a power source coupled to said anode plate and the cathode plate. At least two wires coupled between the anode plate and the cathode plate provide a configuration to form an X-pinch having a photon source size of less than five microns at energies above 2.5 keV. Material at the configuration forming the X-pinch vaporizes upon application of a suitable current to the wires forming a dense hot plasma and emitting a single x-ray pulse with sufficient photons having energies in the range of from about 2.5 keV tomore » about 20 keV to provide a phase contrast image of an object in the path of the photons. Multiple simultaneous images may be formed of a plurality of objects. Suitable filters and x-ray detectors are provided.« less
  • Purpose: A mobile radiography automatic grid alignment system (AGAS) has been developed by modifying a commercially available mobile unit. The objectives of this article are to describe the modifications and operation and to report on the accuracy with which the focal spot is aligned to the grid and the time required to achieve the alignment. Methods: The modifications include an optical target arm attached to the grid tunnel, a video camera attached to the collimator, a motion control system with six degrees of freedom to position the collimator and x-ray tube, and a computer to control the system. The videomore » camera and computer determine the grid position, and then the motion control system drives the x-ray focal spot to the center of the grid focal axis. The accuracy of the alignment of the focal spot with the grid and the time required to achieve alignment were measured both in laboratory tests and in clinical use. Results: For a typical exam, the modified unit automatically aligns the focal spot with the grid in less than 10 s, with an accuracy of better than 4 mm. The results of the speed and accuracy tests in clinical use were similar to the results in laboratory tests. Comparison patient chest images are presented--one obtained with a standard mobile radiographic unit without a grid and the other obtained with the modified unit and a 15:1 grid. The 15:1 grid images demonstrate a marked improvement in image quality compared to the nongrid images with no increase in patient dose. Conclusions: The mobile radiography AGAS produces images of significantly improved quality compared to nongrid images with alignment times of less than 10 s and no increase in patient dose.« less
  • The authors have designed and evaluated a novel design of line array x-ray detector for use with digital radiography (DR) and computed tomography (CT) systems. The Radiographic Line Scan (RLS) detector is less than half the cost of discrete multi-channel line array detectors, yet provides the potential for resolution to less than 25 {micro}m at energies of 420 kV. The RLS detector consists of a scintillator fiber-optically coupled to a thermo-electrically cooled line array CCD. Gadolinium oxysulfide screen material has been used as the scintillator, in thicknesses up to 250 {micro}m. Scintillating glass, which is formed into a fiber opticmore » bundle, has also been used in thicknesses up to 2 mm. The large 2.5 mm by 25 {micro}m CCD cells provide high dynamic range while preserving high resolution; the 2.5 mm dimension is oriented in the x-ray absorption direction while the 25 {micro}m dimension is oriented in the resolution direction. Servo controlled thermo-electric cooling of the CCD to a fixed temperature provides reduction of dark current and stabilization of the output. Greater dynamic range is achieved by reducing the dark current, while output stabilization reduces the need for frequent calibration of the detector. Measured performance characteristics are presented along with DR and CT images produced using the RLS detector.« less