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Title: W15_ionisphere “3D modeling and inversion of ionospheric signals driven from below by earthquakes and tsunami"

Abstract

No abstract provided.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [2];  [3]
  1. Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
  2. Univ. of Nice (France)
  3. Inst. de Physique du Globe de Paris (France)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1345919
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-17-21791
DOE Contract Number:
AC52-06NA25396
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
58 GEOSCIENCES; Planetary Sciences; ionosphere, TEC, seismic source, tsunami, spectral element

Citation Formats

Larmat, Carene, Remillieux, Marcel, Rolland, Lucie, and Lognonne, Philippe. W15_ionisphere “3D modeling and inversion of ionospheric signals driven from below by earthquakes and tsunami". United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1345919.
Larmat, Carene, Remillieux, Marcel, Rolland, Lucie, & Lognonne, Philippe. W15_ionisphere “3D modeling and inversion of ionospheric signals driven from below by earthquakes and tsunami". United States. doi:10.2172/1345919.
Larmat, Carene, Remillieux, Marcel, Rolland, Lucie, and Lognonne, Philippe. Thu . "W15_ionisphere “3D modeling and inversion of ionospheric signals driven from below by earthquakes and tsunami"". United States. doi:10.2172/1345919. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1345919.
@article{osti_1345919,
title = {W15_ionisphere “3D modeling and inversion of ionospheric signals driven from below by earthquakes and tsunami"},
author = {Larmat, Carene and Remillieux, Marcel and Rolland, Lucie and Lognonne, Philippe},
abstractNote = {No abstract provided.},
doi = {10.2172/1345919},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Mar 02 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Thu Mar 02 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}

Technical Report:

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  • In support of the Comprehensive Test Ban, research is underway on the long range propagation of signals from nuclear explosions in the deep underwater sound (SOFAR) channel. This first phase of our work at LLNL on signals in the source regions considered explosions in or above the deep (5000 m) ocean. We studied the variation of wave properties and source region energy coupling as a function of height or depth of burst. Initial calculations on CALE, a two-dimensional hydrodynamics code developed at LLNL by Robert Tipton, were linked at a few hundred milliseconds to a version of NRL`s weak shockmore » code, NPE, which solves the nonlinear progressive wave equation. The wave propagation simulation was performed down to 5000 m depth and out to 10,000 m range. We have developed a procedure to convert the acoustic signals at 10 km range into `starter fields` for calculations on a linear acoustics code which will extend the propagation to ocean basin distances. Recently we have completed calculations to evaluate environmental effects (shallow water, bottom interactions) on signal propagation. We compared results at 25 km range from three calculations of the same I kiloton burst (50 m height-of-burst) in three different environments, namely, deep water, shallow water, and a case with shallow water sloping to deep water. Several results from this last `sloping bottom` case will be 2016 discussed below. In this shallow water study, we found that propagation through shallow water complicates and attenuates the signal; the changes made to the signal may impact detection and discrimination for bursts in some locations.« less