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Title: Collisions of Ir oxide nanoparticles with carbon nanopipettes: Experiments with one nanoparticle

Abstract

Investigating the collisions of individual metal nanoparticles (NPs) with electrodes can provide new insights into their electrocatalytic behavior, mass transport, and interactions with surfaces. Here we report a new experimental setup for studying NP collisions based on the use of carbon nanopipettes to enable monitoring multiple collision events involving the same NP captured inside the pipet cavity. A patch clamp amplifier capable of measuring pA-range currents on the microsecond time scale with a very low noise and stable background was used to record the collision transients. The analysis of current transients produced by oxidation of hydrogen peroxide at one IrOx NP provided information about the origins of deactivation of catalytic NPs and the effects of various experimental conditions on the collision dynamics. Lastly, high-resolution TEM of carbon pipettes was used to attain better understanding of the NP capture and collisions.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [2];  [3]; ORCiD logo [2]
  1. Queens College - CUNY, Flushing, NY (United States)
  2. Queens College - CUNY, Flushing, NY (United States); CUNY, New York, NY (United States)
  3. Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
OSTI Identifier:
1345800
Report Number(s):
BNL-113629-2017-JA
Journal ID: ISSN 0003-2700; R&D Project: 16060; 16060; KC0403020
Grant/Contract Number:
SC00112704
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Analytical Chemistry
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 89; Journal Issue: 5; Journal ID: ISSN 0003-2700
Publisher:
American Chemical Society (ACS)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; Ir oxide nanoparticles carbon nanopipettes; Center for Functional Nanomaterials

Citation Formats

Zhou, Min, Yu, Yun, Hu, Keke, Xin, Huolin L., and Mirkin, Michael V. Collisions of Ir oxide nanoparticles with carbon nanopipettes: Experiments with one nanoparticle. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1021/acs.analchem.6b04140.
Zhou, Min, Yu, Yun, Hu, Keke, Xin, Huolin L., & Mirkin, Michael V. Collisions of Ir oxide nanoparticles with carbon nanopipettes: Experiments with one nanoparticle. United States. doi:10.1021/acs.analchem.6b04140.
Zhou, Min, Yu, Yun, Hu, Keke, Xin, Huolin L., and Mirkin, Michael V. Fri . "Collisions of Ir oxide nanoparticles with carbon nanopipettes: Experiments with one nanoparticle". United States. doi:10.1021/acs.analchem.6b04140. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1345800.
@article{osti_1345800,
title = {Collisions of Ir oxide nanoparticles with carbon nanopipettes: Experiments with one nanoparticle},
author = {Zhou, Min and Yu, Yun and Hu, Keke and Xin, Huolin L. and Mirkin, Michael V.},
abstractNote = {Investigating the collisions of individual metal nanoparticles (NPs) with electrodes can provide new insights into their electrocatalytic behavior, mass transport, and interactions with surfaces. Here we report a new experimental setup for studying NP collisions based on the use of carbon nanopipettes to enable monitoring multiple collision events involving the same NP captured inside the pipet cavity. A patch clamp amplifier capable of measuring pA-range currents on the microsecond time scale with a very low noise and stable background was used to record the collision transients. The analysis of current transients produced by oxidation of hydrogen peroxide at one IrOx NP provided information about the origins of deactivation of catalytic NPs and the effects of various experimental conditions on the collision dynamics. Lastly, high-resolution TEM of carbon pipettes was used to attain better understanding of the NP capture and collisions.},
doi = {10.1021/acs.analchem.6b04140},
journal = {Analytical Chemistry},
number = 5,
volume = 89,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Feb 03 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Fri Feb 03 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
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Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 5works
Citation information provided by
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