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Title: Moderator Demonstration Facility Design and Optimization

Abstract

The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is implementing a Moderator Demonstration Facility (MDF) to demonstrate the performance characteristics of advanced moderators central to the Second Target Station (STS) for SNS. The MDF will use the "spare" front-end installation within the SNS accelerator support complex – an ion source, radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator, and medium-energy beam transport (MEBT) chopper - to provide a 2.5 MeV proton beam of peak current 50 mA and maximum pulse length of less than 10 s at a repetition rate of no more than 60 Hz to a suitable neutron-producing target to demonstrate those aspects of moderator performance necessary to meet the goals of the STS design e ort. The accelerator beam parameters are not open to variation beyond that described above - they are fixed by the nature of the spare front-end installation (the Integrated Test Stand Facility; ITSF). Accordingly, there are some neutronic challenges in developing prototypic moderator illumination from a very non-prototypic primary neutron source; the spallation source we are attempting to mimic has an extended neutron source volume approximately 40 cm long (in the direction of the proton beam), approximately 10 cm wide (horizontally transverse tomore » the proton beam) and approximately 5 cm high (vertically transverse to the proton beam), and an isotropic evaporation energy spectrum with mean energy above 1 MeV. In contrast, the primary neutron source available from the 7Li(p,n) reaction (the most prolific at 2.5 MeV proton energy by more than an order of magnitude) is strongly anisotropic, with an energy spectrum that is both strongly dependent on emission angle and kinematically limited to less than 700 keV, and the interaction zone between the incident protons and any target material (neutron-producing or not) is intrinsically limited to a few tens of microns. The MDF will be unique and innovative amongst the world’s moderator test facilities in that it will be intended to be very prototypic in terms of "moderator illumination" - the spatial variation of the neutron flux entering the moderator itself - as well as capable of testing so-called high-brightness moderators in a wing configuration.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Spallation Neutron Source (SNS)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1345791
Report Number(s):
ORNL/TM-2016/745
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
47 OTHER INSTRUMENTATION

Citation Formats

McClanahan, Tucker C., Gallmeier, Franz X., and Iverson, Erik B. Moderator Demonstration Facility Design and Optimization. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1345791.
McClanahan, Tucker C., Gallmeier, Franz X., & Iverson, Erik B. Moderator Demonstration Facility Design and Optimization. United States. doi:10.2172/1345791.
McClanahan, Tucker C., Gallmeier, Franz X., and Iverson, Erik B. Wed . "Moderator Demonstration Facility Design and Optimization". United States. doi:10.2172/1345791. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1345791.
@article{osti_1345791,
title = {Moderator Demonstration Facility Design and Optimization},
author = {McClanahan, Tucker C. and Gallmeier, Franz X. and Iverson, Erik B.},
abstractNote = {The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is implementing a Moderator Demonstration Facility (MDF) to demonstrate the performance characteristics of advanced moderators central to the Second Target Station (STS) for SNS. The MDF will use the "spare" front-end installation within the SNS accelerator support complex – an ion source, radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator, and medium-energy beam transport (MEBT) chopper - to provide a 2.5 MeV proton beam of peak current 50 mA and maximum pulse length of less than 10 s at a repetition rate of no more than 60 Hz to a suitable neutron-producing target to demonstrate those aspects of moderator performance necessary to meet the goals of the STS design e ort. The accelerator beam parameters are not open to variation beyond that described above - they are fixed by the nature of the spare front-end installation (the Integrated Test Stand Facility; ITSF). Accordingly, there are some neutronic challenges in developing prototypic moderator illumination from a very non-prototypic primary neutron source; the spallation source we are attempting to mimic has an extended neutron source volume approximately 40 cm long (in the direction of the proton beam), approximately 10 cm wide (horizontally transverse to the proton beam) and approximately 5 cm high (vertically transverse to the proton beam), and an isotropic evaporation energy spectrum with mean energy above 1 MeV. In contrast, the primary neutron source available from the 7Li(p,n) reaction (the most prolific at 2.5 MeV proton energy by more than an order of magnitude) is strongly anisotropic, with an energy spectrum that is both strongly dependent on emission angle and kinematically limited to less than 700 keV, and the interaction zone between the incident protons and any target material (neutron-producing or not) is intrinsically limited to a few tens of microns. The MDF will be unique and innovative amongst the world’s moderator test facilities in that it will be intended to be very prototypic in terms of "moderator illumination" - the spatial variation of the neutron flux entering the moderator itself - as well as capable of testing so-called high-brightness moderators in a wing configuration.},
doi = {10.2172/1345791},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Feb 01 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Wed Feb 01 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}

Technical Report:

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