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Title: Optical nanoscopy of high T c cuprate nanoconstriction devices patterned by helium ion beams

Abstract

Helium ion beams (HIB) focused to subnanometer scales have emerged as powerful tools for high-resolution imaging as well as nanoscale lithography, ion milling, or deposition. Quantifying irradiation effects is an essential step toward reliable device fabrication, but most of the depth profiling information is provided by computer simulations rather than the experiment. Here, we demonstrate the use of atomic force microscopy (AFM) combined with scanning near-field optical microscopy (SNOM) to provide three-dimensional (3D) dielectric characterization of high-temperature superconductor devices fabricated by HIB. By imaging the infrared dielectric response obtained from light demodulation at multiple harmonics of the AFM tapping frequency, we find that amorphization caused by the nominally 0.5 nm HIB extends throughout the entire 26.5 nm thickness of the cuprate film and by ~500 nm laterally. This unexpectedly widespread damage in morphology and electronic structure can be attributed to a helium depth distribution substantially modified by the internal device interfaces. Lastly, our study introduces AFM-SNOM as a quantitative tomographic technique for noninvasive 3D characterization of irradiation damage in a wide variety of nanoscale devices.

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1];  [2];  [3];  [4]
  1. Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States)
  2. Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States); Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)
  3. Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States)
  4. Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
OSTI Identifier:
1345742
Report Number(s):
BNL-113584-2017-JA
Journal ID: ISSN 1530-6984; R&D Project: MA509MACA; KC0203020
Grant/Contract Number:
SC00112704
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Nano Letters
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 17; Journal Issue: 3; Journal ID: ISSN 1530-6984
Publisher:
American Chemical Society
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
75 CONDENSED MATTER PHYSICS, SUPERCONDUCTIVITY AND SUPERFLUIDITY; dielectric nanotomography; helium ion scattering and microscopy; nanopatterning; near-field microscopy; superconducting electronics

Citation Formats

Gozar, Adrian, Litombe, N. E., Hoffman, Jennifer E., and Bozovic, I.. Optical nanoscopy of high Tc cuprate nanoconstriction devices patterned by helium ion beams. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1021/acs.nanolett.6b04729.
Gozar, Adrian, Litombe, N. E., Hoffman, Jennifer E., & Bozovic, I.. Optical nanoscopy of high Tc cuprate nanoconstriction devices patterned by helium ion beams. United States. doi:10.1021/acs.nanolett.6b04729.
Gozar, Adrian, Litombe, N. E., Hoffman, Jennifer E., and Bozovic, I.. Mon . "Optical nanoscopy of high Tc cuprate nanoconstriction devices patterned by helium ion beams". United States. doi:10.1021/acs.nanolett.6b04729. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1345742.
@article{osti_1345742,
title = {Optical nanoscopy of high Tc cuprate nanoconstriction devices patterned by helium ion beams},
author = {Gozar, Adrian and Litombe, N. E. and Hoffman, Jennifer E. and Bozovic, I.},
abstractNote = {Helium ion beams (HIB) focused to subnanometer scales have emerged as powerful tools for high-resolution imaging as well as nanoscale lithography, ion milling, or deposition. Quantifying irradiation effects is an essential step toward reliable device fabrication, but most of the depth profiling information is provided by computer simulations rather than the experiment. Here, we demonstrate the use of atomic force microscopy (AFM) combined with scanning near-field optical microscopy (SNOM) to provide three-dimensional (3D) dielectric characterization of high-temperature superconductor devices fabricated by HIB. By imaging the infrared dielectric response obtained from light demodulation at multiple harmonics of the AFM tapping frequency, we find that amorphization caused by the nominally 0.5 nm HIB extends throughout the entire 26.5 nm thickness of the cuprate film and by ~500 nm laterally. This unexpectedly widespread damage in morphology and electronic structure can be attributed to a helium depth distribution substantially modified by the internal device interfaces. Lastly, our study introduces AFM-SNOM as a quantitative tomographic technique for noninvasive 3D characterization of irradiation damage in a wide variety of nanoscale devices.},
doi = {10.1021/acs.nanolett.6b04729},
journal = {Nano Letters},
number = 3,
volume = 17,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Feb 06 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Mon Feb 06 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}

Journal Article:
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