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Title: 2015 Bioenergy Market Report

Abstract

This report is an update to the 2013 report and provides a status of the markets and technology development involved in growing a domestic bioenergy economy as it existed at the end of 2015. It compiles and integrates information to provide a snapshot of the current state and historical trends influencing the development of bioenergy markets. This version features details on the two major bioenergy markets: biofuels and biopower and an overview of bioproducts that enable bioenergy production. The information is intended for policy-makers as well as technology developers and investors tracking bioenergy developments. It also highlights some of the key energy and regulatory drivers of bioenergy markets.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Bioenergy Technologies Office (EE-3B)
OSTI Identifier:
1345716
Report Number(s):
NREL/TP-6A10-66995; DOE/GO-102017-4905
DOE Contract Number:
AC36-08GO28308
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
09 BIOMASS FUELS; 59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; bioenergy; biomass feedstock; biofuels; ethanol; biobutanol; biodiesel; renewable hydrocarbon; biopower; bioproducts; outlook; trends; 2015

Citation Formats

Warner, Ethan, Moriarty, Kristi, Lewis, John, Milbrandt, Anelia, and Schwab, Amy. 2015 Bioenergy Market Report. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1345716.
Warner, Ethan, Moriarty, Kristi, Lewis, John, Milbrandt, Anelia, & Schwab, Amy. 2015 Bioenergy Market Report. United States. doi:10.2172/1345716.
Warner, Ethan, Moriarty, Kristi, Lewis, John, Milbrandt, Anelia, and Schwab, Amy. Tue . "2015 Bioenergy Market Report". United States. doi:10.2172/1345716. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1345716.
@article{osti_1345716,
title = {2015 Bioenergy Market Report},
author = {Warner, Ethan and Moriarty, Kristi and Lewis, John and Milbrandt, Anelia and Schwab, Amy},
abstractNote = {This report is an update to the 2013 report and provides a status of the markets and technology development involved in growing a domestic bioenergy economy as it existed at the end of 2015. It compiles and integrates information to provide a snapshot of the current state and historical trends influencing the development of bioenergy markets. This version features details on the two major bioenergy markets: biofuels and biopower and an overview of bioproducts that enable bioenergy production. The information is intended for policy-makers as well as technology developers and investors tracking bioenergy developments. It also highlights some of the key energy and regulatory drivers of bioenergy markets.},
doi = {10.2172/1345716},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Feb 28 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Tue Feb 28 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}

Technical Report:

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  • This is the March 2015 Update to the Multi-Year Program Plan, which sets forth the goals and structure of the Bioenergy Technologies Office. It identifies the RDD&D activities the Office will focus on over the next four years.
  • This report provides a status of the markets and technology development involved in growing a domestic bioenergy economy as it existed at the end of 2013. It compiles and integrates information to provide a snapshot of the current state and historical trends influencing the development of bioenergy markets. This information is intended for policy-makers as well as technology developers and investors tracking bioenergy developments. It also highlights some of the key energy and regulatory drivers of bioenergy markets.
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