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Title: Now Broadcasting in Planck Definition

Abstract

If reality has finite information content, space has finite fidelity. The quantum wave function that encodes spatial relationships may be limited to information that can be transmitted in a "Planck broadcast", with a bandwidth given by the inverse of the Planck time, about $$2\times 10^{43}$$ bits per second. Such a quantum system can resemble classical space-time on large scales, but locality emerges only gradually and imperfectly. Massive bodies are never perfectly at rest, but very slightly and slowly fluctuate in transverse position, with a spectrum of variation given by the Planck time. This distinctive new kind of noise associated with quantum geometry would not have been noticed up to now, but may be detectable in a new kind of experiment.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Fermilab
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), High Energy Physics (HEP) (SC-25)
OSTI Identifier:
1345654
Report Number(s):
FERMILAB-PUB-13-685-A; arXiv:1307.2283
1242001
DOE Contract Number:  
AC02-07CH11359
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
It From Bit or Bit From It?
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Name: It From Bit or Bit From It?
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Hogan, Craig. Now Broadcasting in Planck Definition. United States: N. p., 2013. Web. doi:10.1007/978-3-319-12946-4_13.
Hogan, Craig. Now Broadcasting in Planck Definition. United States. doi:10.1007/978-3-319-12946-4_13.
Hogan, Craig. Mon . "Now Broadcasting in Planck Definition". United States. doi:10.1007/978-3-319-12946-4_13. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1345654.
@article{osti_1345654,
title = {Now Broadcasting in Planck Definition},
author = {Hogan, Craig},
abstractNote = {If reality has finite information content, space has finite fidelity. The quantum wave function that encodes spatial relationships may be limited to information that can be transmitted in a "Planck broadcast", with a bandwidth given by the inverse of the Planck time, about $2\times 10^{43}$ bits per second. Such a quantum system can resemble classical space-time on large scales, but locality emerges only gradually and imperfectly. Massive bodies are never perfectly at rest, but very slightly and slowly fluctuate in transverse position, with a spectrum of variation given by the Planck time. This distinctive new kind of noise associated with quantum geometry would not have been noticed up to now, but may be detectable in a new kind of experiment.},
doi = {10.1007/978-3-319-12946-4_13},
journal = {It From Bit or Bit From It?},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2013},
month = {7}
}

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