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Title: Better Particle Accelerators with SRF Technology

Abstract

The use of superconducting radio frequency (SRF) technology is a driving force in the development of particle accelerators. Scientists from around the globe are working together to develop the newest materials and techniques to improve the quality and efficiency of the SRF cavities that are essential for this technology.

Authors:
; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
FNAL (Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States))
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1345526
Resource Type:
Multimedia
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
43 PARTICLE ACCELERATORS; SUPERCONDUCTING RADIOFREQUENCY CAVITY; SRF; ULTRA-PURE WATER RINSING; HIGH TEMPERATURE FURNACE TREATMENT; CRYOMODULES

Citation Formats

Padamsee, Hasan, Martinello, Martina, Ross, Marc, Peskin, Michael, and Yamamoto, Akira. Better Particle Accelerators with SRF Technology. United States: N. p., 2017. Web.
Padamsee, Hasan, Martinello, Martina, Ross, Marc, Peskin, Michael, & Yamamoto, Akira. Better Particle Accelerators with SRF Technology. United States.
Padamsee, Hasan, Martinello, Martina, Ross, Marc, Peskin, Michael, and Yamamoto, Akira. Mon . "Better Particle Accelerators with SRF Technology". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1345526.
@article{osti_1345526,
title = {Better Particle Accelerators with SRF Technology},
author = {Padamsee, Hasan and Martinello, Martina and Ross, Marc and Peskin, Michael and Yamamoto, Akira},
abstractNote = {The use of superconducting radio frequency (SRF) technology is a driving force in the development of particle accelerators. Scientists from around the globe are working together to develop the newest materials and techniques to improve the quality and efficiency of the SRF cavities that are essential for this technology.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Feb 20 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Mon Feb 20 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}
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