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Title: How the Geothermal Community Upped the Game for Computer Codes

Abstract

The Geothermal Technologies Office Code Comparison Study brought 11 research institutions together to collaborate on coupled thermal, hydrologic, geomechanical, and geochemical numerical simulators. These codes have the potential to help facilitate widespread geothermal energy development.

Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Geothermal Technologies Office (EE-4G)
OSTI Identifier:
1345505
Resource Type:
Multimedia
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
15 GEOTHERMAL ENERGY; 97 MATHEMATICS AND COMPUTING; PNNL; COMPUTER CODES; ENHANCED GEOTHERMAL SITES; EGS; GEOTHERMAL RESEARCH

Citation Formats

None. How the Geothermal Community Upped the Game for Computer Codes. United States: N. p., 2017. Web.
None. How the Geothermal Community Upped the Game for Computer Codes. United States.
None. Mon . "How the Geothermal Community Upped the Game for Computer Codes". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1345505.
@article{osti_1345505,
title = {How the Geothermal Community Upped the Game for Computer Codes},
author = {None},
abstractNote = {The Geothermal Technologies Office Code Comparison Study brought 11 research institutions together to collaborate on coupled thermal, hydrologic, geomechanical, and geochemical numerical simulators. These codes have the potential to help facilitate widespread geothermal energy development.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Feb 13 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Mon Feb 13 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}
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