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Title: Solar Mosaic Inc. Mosaic Home Solar Loan SunShot 9 Final Report

Abstract

The 6686 Mosaic SunShot award has helped Solar Mosaic Inc to progress from an early stage startup focused on commercial crowdfunding to a leading multi-state residential solar lender. The software platform is now used by the majority of the nation's top solar installers and offers a variety of simple home solar loans. Mosaic is has originated approximately $1Bil in solar loans to date to put solar on over 35k rooftops. The company now lends to homeowners with a wide range of credit scores across multiple states and mitigates boundaries preventing them from profiting from ownership of a home solar system. The project included milestones in 5 main categories: 1. Lending to homeowners outside of CA 2. Lending to homeowners with FICO scores under 700 3. Packaging O&M with the home solar loan 4. Allowing residential installers to process home solar loans via API 5. Lowering customer acquisition costs below $1500 This report includes a detailed review of the final results achieved and key findings.

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1]
  1. Solar Mosaic Inc., Oakland, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Solar Mosaic Inc., Oakland, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Solar Energy Technologies Office (EE-4S)
OSTI Identifier:
1345477
Report Number(s):
DOE-SOLAR-MOSAIC-6686
DOE Contract Number:
EE0006686
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
14 SOLAR ENERGY; solar; residential solar; solar lending; solar loans; home solar

Citation Formats

Walsh, Colin James. Solar Mosaic Inc. Mosaic Home Solar Loan SunShot 9 Final Report. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1345477.
Walsh, Colin James. Solar Mosaic Inc. Mosaic Home Solar Loan SunShot 9 Final Report. United States. doi:10.2172/1345477.
Walsh, Colin James. Thu . "Solar Mosaic Inc. Mosaic Home Solar Loan SunShot 9 Final Report". United States. doi:10.2172/1345477. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1345477.
@article{osti_1345477,
title = {Solar Mosaic Inc. Mosaic Home Solar Loan SunShot 9 Final Report},
author = {Walsh, Colin James},
abstractNote = {The 6686 Mosaic SunShot award has helped Solar Mosaic Inc to progress from an early stage startup focused on commercial crowdfunding to a leading multi-state residential solar lender. The software platform is now used by the majority of the nation's top solar installers and offers a variety of simple home solar loans. Mosaic is has originated approximately $1Bil in solar loans to date to put solar on over 35k rooftops. The company now lends to homeowners with a wide range of credit scores across multiple states and mitigates boundaries preventing them from profiting from ownership of a home solar system. The project included milestones in 5 main categories: 1. Lending to homeowners outside of CA 2. Lending to homeowners with FICO scores under 700 3. Packaging O&M with the home solar loan 4. Allowing residential installers to process home solar loans via API 5. Lowering customer acquisition costs below $1500 This report includes a detailed review of the final results achieved and key findings.},
doi = {10.2172/1345477},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Feb 09 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Thu Feb 09 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}

Technical Report:

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