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Title: 3D level set methods for evolving fronts on tetrahedral meshes with adaptive mesh refinement

Abstract

The level set method is commonly used to model dynamically evolving fronts and interfaces. In this work, we present new methods for evolving fronts with a specified velocity field or in the surface normal direction on 3D unstructured tetrahedral meshes with adaptive mesh refinement (AMR). The level set field is located at the nodes of the tetrahedral cells and is evolved using new upwind discretizations of Hamilton–Jacobi equations combined with a Runge–Kutta method for temporal integration. The level set field is periodically reinitialized to a signed distance function using an iterative approach with a new upwind gradient. We discuss the details of these level set and reinitialization methods. Results from a range of numerical test problems are presented.

Authors:
 [1];  [1]
  1. Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program; USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)
OSTI Identifier:
1345425
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1345928
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-15-28711
Journal ID: ISSN 0021-9991; TRN: US1700656
Grant/Contract Number:
AC52-06NA25396
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Published Article
Journal Name:
Journal of Computational Physics
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 336; Journal ID: ISSN 0021-9991
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
97 MATHEMATICS AND COMPUTING; 71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; Numerical methods

Citation Formats

Morgan, Nathaniel Ray, and Waltz, Jacob I. 3D level set methods for evolving fronts on tetrahedral meshes with adaptive mesh refinement. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1016/j.jcp.2017.02.030.
Morgan, Nathaniel Ray, & Waltz, Jacob I. 3D level set methods for evolving fronts on tetrahedral meshes with adaptive mesh refinement. United States. doi:10.1016/j.jcp.2017.02.030.
Morgan, Nathaniel Ray, and Waltz, Jacob I. Thu . "3D level set methods for evolving fronts on tetrahedral meshes with adaptive mesh refinement". United States. doi:10.1016/j.jcp.2017.02.030.
@article{osti_1345425,
title = {3D level set methods for evolving fronts on tetrahedral meshes with adaptive mesh refinement},
author = {Morgan, Nathaniel Ray and Waltz, Jacob I.},
abstractNote = {The level set method is commonly used to model dynamically evolving fronts and interfaces. In this work, we present new methods for evolving fronts with a specified velocity field or in the surface normal direction on 3D unstructured tetrahedral meshes with adaptive mesh refinement (AMR). The level set field is located at the nodes of the tetrahedral cells and is evolved using new upwind discretizations of Hamilton–Jacobi equations combined with a Runge–Kutta method for temporal integration. The level set field is periodically reinitialized to a signed distance function using an iterative approach with a new upwind gradient. We discuss the details of these level set and reinitialization methods. Results from a range of numerical test problems are presented.},
doi = {10.1016/j.jcp.2017.02.030},
journal = {Journal of Computational Physics},
number = ,
volume = 336,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Mar 02 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Thu Mar 02 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1016/j.jcp.2017.02.030

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 1work
Citation information provided by
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