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Title: Black Carbon at the Mt. Bachelor Observatory Field Campaign Report

Abstract

This campaign was initiated to measure refractory black carbon (rBC, as defined in Schwarz et al. (2010)) at the Mt. Bachelor Observatory (MBO) using the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility single-particle soot photometer (SP2; unit 54). MBO is a high-elevation site located on the summit of Mt. Bachelor in central Oregon, USA (43.979°N, 121.687°W, 2,763 meters ASL). This site is operated by Professor Dan Jaffe’s group at the University of Washington Bothell and has been used continuously as an atmospheric observatory for the past 12 years (Jaffe et al., 2005; Gratz et al., 2014). The location of MBO allows frequent sampling of the free troposphere along with a wide array of plumes from regional and distant sources. MBO is currently supported with funding from the National Science Foundation (NSF) to the Principal Investigator (PI; D. Jaffe) via the project “Influence of Free Tropospheric Ozone and PM on Surface Air Quality in the Western U.S.” (#1447832) covering the period 03/15/2015 to 02/28/2018. The SP2 instrument from Droplet Measurement Technologies provides particle-resolved measurements of rBC mass loading, size and mass distributions, and mixing state. The SP2 was installed at MBO on 6/27/2016 and ran throughmore » 9/23/2016. Additional measurements at MBO during this campaign included carbon monoxide (CO), fine particulate matter (PM1), aerosol light scattering coefficients (σscat) at three wavelengths using a TSI nephelometer, aerosol absorption coefficients (σabs) with the Brechtel tricolor absorption photometer (TAP), aerosol number size distributions with a scanning mobility particle sizer spectrometer (SMPS), and black carbon (eBC) with an aethalometer. BC data from this campaign have been submitted to the ARM Data Archive. Black carbon (BC) is the predominant light-absorbing aerosol constituent in the atmosphere, and is estimated to exert a positive radiative forcing second only to CO 2 (Ramanathan and Carmichael, 2008). One of the largest sources of BC globally is biomass burning (BB). (Akagi et al., 2011; Andreae and Merlet, 2001; Bond et al., 2013; Bond et al., 2004; Reid et al., 2005b): a source that is likely to increase in the Western U.S. due to climate change (Dennison et al., 2014; Abatzoglon and Williams, 2016; Westerling et al., 2006). Given the likely increased role of BB aerosol in atmospheric forcing, we need to improve our understanding of the physical and optical properties of aged BB aerosol. During the SP2 deployment period at MBO we observed seven BB events, all of which originated from the Gap Fire in Northern California, which burned 33,867 acres in the Klamath National Forest (https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4997/). Heavy smoke plumes from this fire were transported to MBO from 8/29/2016 to 8/31/2016. We calculated back-trajectories using the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Hybrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT) model, version 4 (Draxler, 1999; Draxler and Hess, 1997, 1998; Stein et al., 2015) to confirm transport from the fire locations to MBO. We identified the fire locations using moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) satellite-derived active fire counts (Justice et al., 2002). Transport time for all of the BB events ranged from 8 to 32 hours.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [1]
  1. Univ. of Washington, Bothell, WA (United States)
  2. Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
DOE Office of Science Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23)
OSTI Identifier:
1345377
Report Number(s):
DOE/SC-ARM-17-005
DOE Contract Number:  
AC05-7601830
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; Black carbon; brown carbon; aersols; wildfires; Mt. Bachelor Observatory; aethalometer; single-particle soot photometer; biomass burning; nephelometer; moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer

Citation Formats

Jaffe, Dan A., Sedlacek, Arthur, and Laing, James R. Black Carbon at the Mt. Bachelor Observatory Field Campaign Report. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1345377.
Jaffe, Dan A., Sedlacek, Arthur, & Laing, James R. Black Carbon at the Mt. Bachelor Observatory Field Campaign Report. United States. doi:10.2172/1345377.
Jaffe, Dan A., Sedlacek, Arthur, and Laing, James R. Wed . "Black Carbon at the Mt. Bachelor Observatory Field Campaign Report". United States. doi:10.2172/1345377. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1345377.
@article{osti_1345377,
title = {Black Carbon at the Mt. Bachelor Observatory Field Campaign Report},
author = {Jaffe, Dan A. and Sedlacek, Arthur and Laing, James R.},
abstractNote = {This campaign was initiated to measure refractory black carbon (rBC, as defined in Schwarz et al. (2010)) at the Mt. Bachelor Observatory (MBO) using the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility single-particle soot photometer (SP2; unit 54). MBO is a high-elevation site located on the summit of Mt. Bachelor in central Oregon, USA (43.979°N, 121.687°W, 2,763 meters ASL). This site is operated by Professor Dan Jaffe’s group at the University of Washington Bothell and has been used continuously as an atmospheric observatory for the past 12 years (Jaffe et al., 2005; Gratz et al., 2014). The location of MBO allows frequent sampling of the free troposphere along with a wide array of plumes from regional and distant sources. MBO is currently supported with funding from the National Science Foundation (NSF) to the Principal Investigator (PI; D. Jaffe) via the project “Influence of Free Tropospheric Ozone and PM on Surface Air Quality in the Western U.S.” (#1447832) covering the period 03/15/2015 to 02/28/2018. The SP2 instrument from Droplet Measurement Technologies provides particle-resolved measurements of rBC mass loading, size and mass distributions, and mixing state. The SP2 was installed at MBO on 6/27/2016 and ran through 9/23/2016. Additional measurements at MBO during this campaign included carbon monoxide (CO), fine particulate matter (PM1), aerosol light scattering coefficients (σscat) at three wavelengths using a TSI nephelometer, aerosol absorption coefficients (σabs) with the Brechtel tricolor absorption photometer (TAP), aerosol number size distributions with a scanning mobility particle sizer spectrometer (SMPS), and black carbon (eBC) with an aethalometer. BC data from this campaign have been submitted to the ARM Data Archive. Black carbon (BC) is the predominant light-absorbing aerosol constituent in the atmosphere, and is estimated to exert a positive radiative forcing second only to CO2 (Ramanathan and Carmichael, 2008). One of the largest sources of BC globally is biomass burning (BB). (Akagi et al., 2011; Andreae and Merlet, 2001; Bond et al., 2013; Bond et al., 2004; Reid et al., 2005b): a source that is likely to increase in the Western U.S. due to climate change (Dennison et al., 2014; Abatzoglon and Williams, 2016; Westerling et al., 2006). Given the likely increased role of BB aerosol in atmospheric forcing, we need to improve our understanding of the physical and optical properties of aged BB aerosol. During the SP2 deployment period at MBO we observed seven BB events, all of which originated from the Gap Fire in Northern California, which burned 33,867 acres in the Klamath National Forest (https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4997/). Heavy smoke plumes from this fire were transported to MBO from 8/29/2016 to 8/31/2016. We calculated back-trajectories using the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Hybrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT) model, version 4 (Draxler, 1999; Draxler and Hess, 1997, 1998; Stein et al., 2015) to confirm transport from the fire locations to MBO. We identified the fire locations using moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) satellite-derived active fire counts (Justice et al., 2002). Transport time for all of the BB events ranged from 8 to 32 hours.},
doi = {10.2172/1345377},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Wed Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}

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