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Title: Eigenmodes of a quartz tuning fork and their application to photoinduced force microscopy

Authors:
; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1345276
Grant/Contract Number:
SC0013172
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Physical Review B
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 95; Journal Issue: 7; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2017-02-28 22:09:24; Journal ID: ISSN 2469-9950
Publisher:
American Physical Society
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Kim, Bongsu, Jahng, Junghoon, Khan, Ryan Muhammad, Park, Sung, and Potma, Eric O. Eigenmodes of a quartz tuning fork and their application to photoinduced force microscopy. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1103/PhysRevB.95.075440.
Kim, Bongsu, Jahng, Junghoon, Khan, Ryan Muhammad, Park, Sung, & Potma, Eric O. Eigenmodes of a quartz tuning fork and their application to photoinduced force microscopy. United States. doi:10.1103/PhysRevB.95.075440.
Kim, Bongsu, Jahng, Junghoon, Khan, Ryan Muhammad, Park, Sung, and Potma, Eric O. Tue . "Eigenmodes of a quartz tuning fork and their application to photoinduced force microscopy". United States. doi:10.1103/PhysRevB.95.075440.
@article{osti_1345276,
title = {Eigenmodes of a quartz tuning fork and their application to photoinduced force microscopy},
author = {Kim, Bongsu and Jahng, Junghoon and Khan, Ryan Muhammad and Park, Sung and Potma, Eric O.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1103/PhysRevB.95.075440},
journal = {Physical Review B},
number = 7,
volume = 95,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Feb 28 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Tue Feb 28 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1103/PhysRevB.95.075440

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 2works
Citation information provided by
Web of Science

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  • This paper introduces a nanopipette combined with a quartz tuning fork-atomic force microscope system (nanopipette/QTF-AFM), and describes experimental and theoretical investigations of the nanoscale materials used. The system offers several advantages over conventional cantilever-based AFM and QTF-AFM systems, including simple control of the quality factor based on the contact position of the QTF, easy variation of the effective tip diameter, electrical detection, on-demand delivery and patterning of various solutions, and in situ surface characterization after patterning. This tool enables nanoscale liquid delivery and nanofabrication processes without damaging the apex of the tip in various environments, and also offers force spectroscopymore » and microscopy capabilities.« less
  • Based on a two-prong type quartz tuning fork, a force sensor with a high Q factor, which we call a retuned fork sensor, was developed for non-contact atomic force microscopy (nc-AFM) with atomic resolution. By cutting a small notch and attaching an AFM tip to one prong, its resonance frequency can be retuned to that of the other intact prong. In balancing the two prongs in this manner, a high Q factor (>50 000 in ultrahigh vacuum) is obtained for the sensor. An atomic resolution image of the Si(111)-7 × 7 surface was demonstrated using an nc-AFM with the sensor. The dependence ofmore » the Q factor on resonance frequency of the sensor and the long-range force between tip and sample were measured and analyzed in view of the various dissipation channels. Dissipation in the signal detection circuit turned out to be mainly limited by the total Q factor of the nc-AFM system.« less
  • Understanding the mechanical properties of nanoscale systems requires new experimental and theoretical tools. In particular, force sensors compatible with nanomechanical testing experiments and with sensitivity in the nN range are required. Here, we report the development and testing of a tuning-fork-based force sensor for in situ nanomanipulation experiments inside a scanning electron microscope. The sensor uses a very simple design for the electronics and it allows the direct and quantitative force measurement in the 1–100 nN force range. The sensor response is initially calibrated against a nN range force standard, as, for example, a calibrated Atomic Force Microscopy cantilever; subsequently,more » applied force values can be directly derived using only the electric signals generated by the tuning fork. Using a homemade nanomanipulator, the quantitative force sensor has been used to analyze the mechanical deformation of multi-walled carbon nanotube bundles, where we analyzed forces in the 5–40 nN range, measured with an error bar of a few nN.« less
  • A photo-thermal excitation of a Quartz Tuning Fork (QTF) for topographic studies is introduced. The non-invasive photo-thermal excitation presents practical advantages compared to QTF mechanical and electrical excitations, including the absence of the anti-resonance and its associated phase rotation. Comparison between our theoretical model and experiments validate that the optical transduction mechanism is a photo-thermal rather than photo-thermoacoustic phenomenon. Topographic maps in the context of near-field microscopy distance control have been achieved to demonstrate the performance of the system.
  • A novel probe for scanning thermal microscope using a micro-thermocouple probe placed on a Quartz Tuning Fork (QTF) is presented. Instead of using an external deflection with a cantilever beam for contact detection, an original combination of piezoelectric resonator and thermal probe is employed. Due to a non-contact photothermal excitation principle, the high quality factor of the QTF allows the probe-to-surface contact detection. Topographic and thermal scanning images obtained on a specific sample points out the interest of our system as an alternative to cantilevered resistive probe systems which are the most spread.