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Title: Low-Carbon City Policy Databook: 72 Policy Recommendations for Chinese Cities from the Benchmarking and Energy Savings Tool for Low Carbon Cities

Abstract

This report is designed to help city authorities evaluate and prioritize more than 70 different policy strategies that can reduce their city’s energy use and carbon-based greenhouse gas emissions of carbon dioxide (CO 2) and methane (CH 4). Local government officials, researchers, and planners can utilize the report to identify policies most relevant to local circumstances and to develop a low carbon city action plan that can be implemented in phases, over a multi-year timeframe. The policies cover nine city sectors: industry, public and commercial buildings, residential buildings, transportation, power and heat, street lighting, water & wastewater, solid waste, and urban green space. See Table 1 for a listing of the policies. Recognizing the prominence of urban industry in the energy and carbon inventories of Chinese cities, this report includes low carbon city policies for the industrial sector. The policies gathered here have proven effective in multiple locations around the world and have the potential to achieve future energy and carbon savings in Chinese cities.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [2]
  1. Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Energy Technologies Area. Energy Analysis and Environmental Impacts Division. China Energy Group
  2. Energy Foundation China, Beijing (China)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE; Energy Foundation China
OSTI Identifier:
1345201
Report Number(s):
LBNL-1006326
ir:1006326
DOE Contract Number:
AC02-05CH11231
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY, AND ECONOMY

Citation Formats

Price, Lynn, Zhou, Nan, Fridley, David, Ohshita, Stephanie, Khanna, Nina, Lu, Hongyou, Hong, Lixuan, He, Gang, Romankiewicz, John, and Min, Hu. Low-Carbon City Policy Databook: 72 Policy Recommendations for Chinese Cities from the Benchmarking and Energy Savings Tool for Low Carbon Cities. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.2172/1345201.
Price, Lynn, Zhou, Nan, Fridley, David, Ohshita, Stephanie, Khanna, Nina, Lu, Hongyou, Hong, Lixuan, He, Gang, Romankiewicz, John, & Min, Hu. Low-Carbon City Policy Databook: 72 Policy Recommendations for Chinese Cities from the Benchmarking and Energy Savings Tool for Low Carbon Cities. United States. doi:10.2172/1345201.
Price, Lynn, Zhou, Nan, Fridley, David, Ohshita, Stephanie, Khanna, Nina, Lu, Hongyou, Hong, Lixuan, He, Gang, Romankiewicz, John, and Min, Hu. 2016. "Low-Carbon City Policy Databook: 72 Policy Recommendations for Chinese Cities from the Benchmarking and Energy Savings Tool for Low Carbon Cities". United States. doi:10.2172/1345201. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1345201.
@article{osti_1345201,
title = {Low-Carbon City Policy Databook: 72 Policy Recommendations for Chinese Cities from the Benchmarking and Energy Savings Tool for Low Carbon Cities},
author = {Price, Lynn and Zhou, Nan and Fridley, David and Ohshita, Stephanie and Khanna, Nina and Lu, Hongyou and Hong, Lixuan and He, Gang and Romankiewicz, John and Min, Hu},
abstractNote = {This report is designed to help city authorities evaluate and prioritize more than 70 different policy strategies that can reduce their city’s energy use and carbon-based greenhouse gas emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4). Local government officials, researchers, and planners can utilize the report to identify policies most relevant to local circumstances and to develop a low carbon city action plan that can be implemented in phases, over a multi-year timeframe. The policies cover nine city sectors: industry, public and commercial buildings, residential buildings, transportation, power and heat, street lighting, water & wastewater, solid waste, and urban green space. See Table 1 for a listing of the policies. Recognizing the prominence of urban industry in the energy and carbon inventories of Chinese cities, this report includes low carbon city policies for the industrial sector. The policies gathered here have proven effective in multiple locations around the world and have the potential to achieve future energy and carbon savings in Chinese cities.},
doi = {10.2172/1345201},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 7
}

Technical Report:

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