skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Exploring the energy benefits of advanced water metering

Abstract

Recent improvements to advanced water metering and communications technologies have the potential to improve the management of water resources and utility infrastructure, benefiting both utilities and ratepayers. The highly granular, near-real-time data and opportunity for automated control provided by these advanced systems may yield operational benefits similar to those afforded by similar technologies in the energy sector. While significant progress has been made in quantifying the water-related benefits of these technologies, the research on quantifying the energy benefits of improved water metering is underdeveloped. Some studies have quantified the embedded energy in water in California, however these findings are based on data more than a decade old, and unanimously assert that more research is needed to further explore how topography, climate, water source, and other factors impact their findings. In this report, we show how water-related advanced metering systems may present a broader and more significant set of energy-related benefits. We review the open literature of water-related advanced metering technologies and their applications, discuss common themes with a series of water and energy experts, and perform a preliminary scoping analysis of advanced water metering deployment and use in California. We find that the open literature provides very little discussion ofmore » the energy savings potential of advanced water metering, despite the substantial energy necessary for water’s extraction, conveyance, treatment, distribution, and eventual end use. We also find that water AMI has the potential to provide water-energy co-efficiencies through improved water systems management, with benefits including improved customer education, automated leak detection, water measurement and verification, optimized system operation, and inherent water and energy conservation. Our findings also suggest that the adoption of these technologies in the water sector has been slow, due to structural economic and regulatory barriers. In California, we see examples of deployed advanced metering systems with demonstrated embedded energy savings through water conservation and leak detection. Finally, we also see substantial untapped opportunity in the agricultural sector for enabling electric demand response for both traditional peak shaving and more complex flexible and ancillary services through improved water tracking and farm automation.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [2];  [1]
  1. Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
  2. Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1345196
Report Number(s):
LBNL-1005988
ir:1005988
DOE Contract Number:
AC02-05CH11231
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; water resources management; advanced metering infrastructure; water-energy nexus; energy services

Citation Formats

Berger, Michael A., Hans, Liesel, Piscopo, Kate, and Sohn, Michael D.. Exploring the energy benefits of advanced water metering. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.2172/1345196.
Berger, Michael A., Hans, Liesel, Piscopo, Kate, & Sohn, Michael D.. Exploring the energy benefits of advanced water metering. United States. doi:10.2172/1345196.
Berger, Michael A., Hans, Liesel, Piscopo, Kate, and Sohn, Michael D.. 2016. "Exploring the energy benefits of advanced water metering". United States. doi:10.2172/1345196.
@article{osti_1345196,
title = {Exploring the energy benefits of advanced water metering},
author = {Berger, Michael A. and Hans, Liesel and Piscopo, Kate and Sohn, Michael D.},
abstractNote = {Recent improvements to advanced water metering and communications technologies have the potential to improve the management of water resources and utility infrastructure, benefiting both utilities and ratepayers. The highly granular, near-real-time data and opportunity for automated control provided by these advanced systems may yield operational benefits similar to those afforded by similar technologies in the energy sector. While significant progress has been made in quantifying the water-related benefits of these technologies, the research on quantifying the energy benefits of improved water metering is underdeveloped. Some studies have quantified the embedded energy in water in California, however these findings are based on data more than a decade old, and unanimously assert that more research is needed to further explore how topography, climate, water source, and other factors impact their findings. In this report, we show how water-related advanced metering systems may present a broader and more significant set of energy-related benefits. We review the open literature of water-related advanced metering technologies and their applications, discuss common themes with a series of water and energy experts, and perform a preliminary scoping analysis of advanced water metering deployment and use in California. We find that the open literature provides very little discussion of the energy savings potential of advanced water metering, despite the substantial energy necessary for water’s extraction, conveyance, treatment, distribution, and eventual end use. We also find that water AMI has the potential to provide water-energy co-efficiencies through improved water systems management, with benefits including improved customer education, automated leak detection, water measurement and verification, optimized system operation, and inherent water and energy conservation. Our findings also suggest that the adoption of these technologies in the water sector has been slow, due to structural economic and regulatory barriers. In California, we see examples of deployed advanced metering systems with demonstrated embedded energy savings through water conservation and leak detection. Finally, we also see substantial untapped opportunity in the agricultural sector for enabling electric demand response for both traditional peak shaving and more complex flexible and ancillary services through improved water tracking and farm automation.},
doi = {10.2172/1345196},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 8
}

Technical Report:
Other availability
Please see Document Availability for additional information on obtaining the full-text document. Library patrons may search WorldCat to identify libraries that may hold this item. Keep in mind that many technical reports are not cataloged in WorldCat.

Save / Share:
  • This updated Advanced Metering Plan for monitoring whole building energy use in Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) EMS4 buildings on the PNNL campus has been prepared in accordance with the requirements of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct 2005), Section 103, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 430.2B, and Metering Best Practices, A Guide to Achieving Utility Resource Efficiency, Federal Energy Management Program, October 2007 (Sullivan et al. 2007). The initial PNNL plan was developed in July 2007 (Olson 2007), updated in September 2008 (Olson et al. 2008), updated in September 2009 (Olson et al. 2009), and updated againmore » in August 2010 (Olson et al. 2010).« less
  • Attempts to quantify the benefits of controlling air and water pollution arising from the production and consumption of energy are discussed. Methods for evaluating benefits, intended primarily as instructional to members of the Energy Resources Conservation and Development Commission staff involved in evaluating the benefits of environmental controls in California, are presented. One distinctive aspect of the report is its attempt to discuss the contribution to society made by the natural functioning of ecosystems. It is pointed out that this aspect of ecosystems is distinct from the role nature plays in providing physical resources of economic value, and from recreationalmore » and aesthetic enjoyment of the natural environment. A detailed discussion of the economics of benefit analysis, bringing together considerations in welfare economics relevant to benefits analysis, is provided.« less
  • This Plan presents progress toward the metering goals shared by all national laboratories and discusses PNNL's contemporary approach to the installation of new meters. In addition, the Plan discusses the data analysis techniques with which PNNL is working to mature using endless data streams made available as a result of increased meter deployment.
  • The Office of Energy Resources of the Bonneville Power Administration carriers out generation and conservation resource planning. The analysis of historical trends in and determinants of energy consumption is carried out by the office's End-Use Research Section. The End-Use Research Section operates a comprehensive data collection program to provide pertinent information to support demand-side conservation planning, load forecasting, and conservation program development and delivery. Part of this on-going program, commonly known as the End-Use Load and Consumer Assessment Program (ELCAP), was recently renamed the Regional End-Use Metering Project (REMP) to reflect an emphasis on metering rather than analytical activities. REMPmore » is designed to collect electricity usage data through direct monitoring of end-use loads in buildings in the residential and commercial sectors and is conducted for Bonneville by Pacific Northwest Laboratories (Battelle). The detailed summary information in this report is on energy used for water heaters in the residential sector and is based on data collected from September 1985 through December 1990 for 336 of the 499 REMP metered homes. Specific information is provided on annual loads averaged over the years and their variation across residences. Descriptions are given of use as associated with demographic and energy-related characteristics. Summaries are also provided for electricity use by each year, month, and daytype, as well as at peak hot water load and peak system times. This is the second residential report. This report focuses on a specific end use and adds detail to the first report. Subsequent reports are planned on other individual end uses or sets of end uses. 15 refs., 29 figs., 10 tabs.« less
  • The information in this two-volume report is organized as follows: in Volume I, entitled Energy Network Charts for Advanced Fossil Energy Technologies, a series of charts is presented showing the applications of advanced fossil energy technologies to the recovery, conversion, or utilization of fossil energy (coal, oil shale, crude oil, and natural gas). In this Volume II, outcome tables are presented that characterize the probable results of advanced technology research, development, and demonstration (R, D and D) for coal gasification, coal liquefaction, oil shale conversion, electric power generation, enhanced oil recovery, and enhanced gas recovery. Areas are highlighted where suchmore » results are not presently available or are incomplete. Tables are also presented that show groupings of technologies; for example, technologies producing high-Btu gas from coal are grouped together. The rationale for groupings is explained.« less