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Title: High Temperature Perforating System for Geothermal Applications

Abstract

The objective of this project is to develop a perforating system consisting of all the explosive components and hardware, capable of reliable performance in high temperatures geothermal wells (>200 ºC). In this light we will focused on engineering development of these components, characterization of the explosive raw powder and developing the internal infrastructure to increase the production of the explosive from laboratory scale to industrial scale.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Schlumberger Technology Corporation, Sugar Land, TX (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Schlumberger Technology Corporation, Sugar Land, TX (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Geothermal Technologies Office (EE-4G)
OSTI Identifier:
1345110
Report Number(s):
DE-EE0002788
DOE Contract Number:
EE0002788
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
15 GEOTHERMAL ENERGY

Citation Formats

Smart, Moises E. High Temperature Perforating System for Geothermal Applications. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1345110.
Smart, Moises E. High Temperature Perforating System for Geothermal Applications. United States. doi:10.2172/1345110.
Smart, Moises E. Tue . "High Temperature Perforating System for Geothermal Applications". United States. doi:10.2172/1345110. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1345110.
@article{osti_1345110,
title = {High Temperature Perforating System for Geothermal Applications},
author = {Smart, Moises E.},
abstractNote = {The objective of this project is to develop a perforating system consisting of all the explosive components and hardware, capable of reliable performance in high temperatures geothermal wells (>200 ºC). In this light we will focused on engineering development of these components, characterization of the explosive raw powder and developing the internal infrastructure to increase the production of the explosive from laboratory scale to industrial scale.},
doi = {10.2172/1345110},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Feb 28 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Tue Feb 28 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}

Technical Report:

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  • The performance of a pH sensor for use in hot geothermal brine was determined by laboratory tests simulating the expected conditions of use. Tests were conducted at temperatures from 21/sup 0/C to 260/sup 0/C and pressures from atmospheric to 5000 psi. Probes were constructed according to the design recommended. Deficiencies were found in the areas of seal, stem glass integrity and glass stability in hot simulated brine. Modifications of the design were made and tested, the improved versions overcoming the seal and stem glass cracking problems. A different pH glass formulation was used which improved sensor performance. Test results ofmore » the final design show that the sensor survived hot brine exposure at temperatures up to and including 200/sup 0/C, retaining its low temperature pH measuring capability. Exposure to 250/sup 0/C brine resulted in irreversible probe changes which caused sensor deterioration and failure. Comparative results are shown.« less
  • The U.S. Department of Energy is leading the development of alternative energy sources that will ensure the long-term energy independence of our nation. One of the key renewable resources currently being advanced is geothermal energy. To tap into the large potential offered by generating power from the heat of the earth, and for geothermal energy to be more widely used, it will be necessary to drill deeper wells to reach the hot, dry rock located up to 10 km beneath the earth’s surface. In this instance, water will be introduced into the well to create a geothermal reservoir. A geothermalmore » well produced in this manner is referred to as an enhanced geothermal system (EGS). EGS reservoirs are typically at depths of 3 to 10 km, and the temperatures at these depths have become a limiting factor in the application of existing downhole technologies. These high temperatures are especially problematic for electronic systems such as downhole data-logging tools, which are used to map and characterize the fractures and high-permeability regions in underground formations. Information provided by these tools is assessed so that underground formations capable of providing geothermal energy can be identified, and the subsequent drilling operations can be accurately directed to those locations. The mapping of geothermal resources involves the design and fabrication of sensor packages, including the electronic control modules, to quantify downhole conditions (300°C temperature, high pressure, seismic activity, etc.). Because of the extreme depths at which these measurements are performed, it is most desirable to perform the sensor signal processing downhole and then transmit the information to the surface. This approach necessitates the use of high-temperature electronics that can operate in the downhole environment. Downhole signal processing in EGS wells will require the development and demonstration of circuit boards that can withstand the elevated temperatures found at these depths. At present, the highest-temperature commercially available circuit boards are based on polyimide materials, and those have maximum use temperatures of 200 to 250°C. In addition to thermal stability, downhole electronics must also be fabricated into high-aspect-ratio packages. For example, the multilayer assemblies produced at SNL were approximately 2.5 cm wide and 50 cm long. Because of this very high form factor, glass-fiber-reinforced polymers are much more desirable than multilayer ceramic modules (MCM). MCMs have many advantages for some applications, but are susceptible to damage induced by the mechanical and vibrational loads commonly experienced by data-logging tools. Thus, as EGS technology continues to advance, there is a strong need for multilayer electronics that can provide the necessary thermal performance while also being compatible with high-form-factor circuit designs. This project involved the design and development of high-temperature circuit materials, as well as the fabrication and testing of circuit components. The material development included the evaluation of various polymer/fiberglass composites, whereas the circuit components were tested using conventional microelectronic evaluation techniques. This effort targeted development of a new class of high-temperature multilayer circuit boards for use in downhole data-logging applications where temperatures are on the order of 300°C. This is consistent with DOE’s multiyear plan for advancing technologies for use in enhanced geothermal systems. Organic and inorganic polymer systems, both with glass reinforcements, were considered to provide the following performance at elevated temperatures: • Mechanical strength and durability • High dielectric strength and electrical resistivity • Thermal stability • Strong adhesion to copper to ensure the reliability of the multilayer assemblies • Processing characteristics that are consistent with state-of-the-art multilayer circuit board manufacturing practices« less