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Title: Co-occurrence of extremes in surface ozone, particulate matter, and temperature over eastern North America

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1345072
Grant/Contract Number:
SC0012536
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Published Article
Journal Name:
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 114; Journal Issue: 11; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2017-06-25 07:30:51; Journal ID: ISSN 0027-8424
Publisher:
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Schnell, Jordan L., and Prather, Michael J.. Co-occurrence of extremes in surface ozone, particulate matter, and temperature over eastern North America. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1073/pnas.1614453114.
Schnell, Jordan L., & Prather, Michael J.. Co-occurrence of extremes in surface ozone, particulate matter, and temperature over eastern North America. United States. doi:10.1073/pnas.1614453114.
Schnell, Jordan L., and Prather, Michael J.. Mon . "Co-occurrence of extremes in surface ozone, particulate matter, and temperature over eastern North America". United States. doi:10.1073/pnas.1614453114.
@article{osti_1345072,
title = {Co-occurrence of extremes in surface ozone, particulate matter, and temperature over eastern North America},
author = {Schnell, Jordan L. and Prather, Michael J.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1073/pnas.1614453114},
journal = {Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America},
number = 11,
volume = 114,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Feb 27 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Mon Feb 27 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1073/pnas.1614453114

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 3works
Citation information provided by
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  • Cited by 9
  • Observations at sites in eastern North America show a strong correlation between O3 and CO concentrations in summer, with a consistent slope DeltaO3/DeltaCO approximately = 0.3. Observations in the aged Denver plume at Niwot Ridge, Colorado, also show a strong correlation but with DeltaO3/DeltaCO = 0.15. These data offer a sensitive test for evaluating the ability of photochemical models to simulate production of O3 over North America and its export to the global atmosphere. Application to the Harvard/Goddard Institute for Space Studies three-dimensional, continental-scale model shows that the model gives a good simulation of the observed O3-CO correlations and ofmore » the associated DeltaO3/DeltaCO. This successful simulation lends support to model estimates of 6 Gmol/d for the net O3 production in the U.S. boundary layer in summer (corresponding to a net O3 production efficiency of 5.5, which is the number of O3 molecules produced per molecule of NOx consumed) and 70% for the fraction of the net production that is exported to the global atmosphere. Export of U.S. pollution appears to make a significant contribution to total tropospheric O3 over the northern hemisphere in summer. Simple interpretation of observed DeltaO3/DeltaCO as an O3/CO anthropogenic enhancement ratio is shown to underestimate substantially anthropogenic O3 production, because O3 and CO concentrations are negatively correlated in the absence of photochemistry. It is also shown that concurrent observations of DeltaO3/DeltaCO and DeltaO3/Delta(NO(y)-NO(x)) ratios can be used to impose lower and upper limits on the net O3 production efficiency.« less
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