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Title: Software Comparison for Renewable Energy Deployment in a Distribution Network

Abstract

The main objective of this report is to evaluate different software options for performing robust distributed generation (DG) power system modeling. The features and capabilities of four simulation tools, OpenDSS, GridLAB-D, CYMDIST, and PowerWorld Simulator, are compared to analyze their effectiveness in analyzing distribution networks with DG. OpenDSS and GridLAB-D, two open source software, have the capability to simulate networks with fluctuating data values. These packages allow the running of a simulation each time instant by iterating only the main script file. CYMDIST, a commercial software, allows for time-series simulation to study variations on network controls. PowerWorld Simulator, another commercial tool, has a batch mode simulation function through the 'Time Step Simulation' tool, which obtains solutions for a list of specified time points. PowerWorld Simulator is intended for analysis of transmission-level systems, while the other three are designed for distribution systems. CYMDIST and PowerWorld Simulator feature easy-to-use graphical user interfaces (GUIs). OpenDSS and GridLAB-D, on the other hand, are based on command-line programs, which increase the time necessary to become familiar with the software packages.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [2];  [2]
  1. Alternative Power Innovations, LLC, Sharonville, OH (United States)
  2. National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), USDOE Office of International Affairs (IA)
OSTI Identifier:
1345057
Report Number(s):
NREL/TP-5D00-64228
DOE Contract Number:
AC36-08GO28308
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
24 POWER TRANSMISSION AND DISTRIBUTION; 29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY, AND ECONOMY; distributed generation; simulation; software modeling; OpenDSS; GridLAB-D; CYMDIST; PowerWorld

Citation Formats

Gao, David Wenzhong, Muljadi, Eduard, Tian, Tian, and Miller, Mackay. Software Comparison for Renewable Energy Deployment in a Distribution Network. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1345057.
Gao, David Wenzhong, Muljadi, Eduard, Tian, Tian, & Miller, Mackay. Software Comparison for Renewable Energy Deployment in a Distribution Network. United States. doi:10.2172/1345057.
Gao, David Wenzhong, Muljadi, Eduard, Tian, Tian, and Miller, Mackay. Wed . "Software Comparison for Renewable Energy Deployment in a Distribution Network". United States. doi:10.2172/1345057. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1345057.
@article{osti_1345057,
title = {Software Comparison for Renewable Energy Deployment in a Distribution Network},
author = {Gao, David Wenzhong and Muljadi, Eduard and Tian, Tian and Miller, Mackay},
abstractNote = {The main objective of this report is to evaluate different software options for performing robust distributed generation (DG) power system modeling. The features and capabilities of four simulation tools, OpenDSS, GridLAB-D, CYMDIST, and PowerWorld Simulator, are compared to analyze their effectiveness in analyzing distribution networks with DG. OpenDSS and GridLAB-D, two open source software, have the capability to simulate networks with fluctuating data values. These packages allow the running of a simulation each time instant by iterating only the main script file. CYMDIST, a commercial software, allows for time-series simulation to study variations on network controls. PowerWorld Simulator, another commercial tool, has a batch mode simulation function through the 'Time Step Simulation' tool, which obtains solutions for a list of specified time points. PowerWorld Simulator is intended for analysis of transmission-level systems, while the other three are designed for distribution systems. CYMDIST and PowerWorld Simulator feature easy-to-use graphical user interfaces (GUIs). OpenDSS and GridLAB-D, on the other hand, are based on command-line programs, which increase the time necessary to become familiar with the software packages.},
doi = {10.2172/1345057},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Feb 22 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Wed Feb 22 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}

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