skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: SISGR: Multiscale Modeling of Multiphase Flow, Transport, and Reactions in Porous Medium Systems

Abstract

The purpose of this section is to summarize the progress made on this project during the previous funding cycle and to summarize the current state of our work. Advancements have been made in theory, microscale simulation, evaluation and validation of models, applications, and dissemination of research. Each of these areas are summarized in turn in the sections that follow.

Authors:
 [1];  [1]
  1. Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
1345027
DOE Contract Number:
SC0002163
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS

Citation Formats

Miller, Cass T., and Gray, William G.. SISGR: Multiscale Modeling of Multiphase Flow, Transport, and Reactions in Porous Medium Systems. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1345027.
Miller, Cass T., & Gray, William G.. SISGR: Multiscale Modeling of Multiphase Flow, Transport, and Reactions in Porous Medium Systems. United States. doi:10.2172/1345027.
Miller, Cass T., and Gray, William G.. Tue . "SISGR: Multiscale Modeling of Multiphase Flow, Transport, and Reactions in Porous Medium Systems". United States. doi:10.2172/1345027. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1345027.
@article{osti_1345027,
title = {SISGR: Multiscale Modeling of Multiphase Flow, Transport, and Reactions in Porous Medium Systems},
author = {Miller, Cass T. and Gray, William G.},
abstractNote = {The purpose of this section is to summarize the progress made on this project during the previous funding cycle and to summarize the current state of our work. Advancements have been made in theory, microscale simulation, evaluation and validation of models, applications, and dissemination of research. Each of these areas are summarized in turn in the sections that follow.},
doi = {10.2172/1345027},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Feb 28 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Tue Feb 28 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}

Technical Report:

Save / Share:
  • The Hanford Site, in southeastern Washington State, has been used extensively to produce nuclear materials for the US strategic defense arsenal by the Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessors, the US Atomic Energy Commission and the US Energy Research and Development Administration. A large inventory of radioactive and mixed waste has accumulated in 177 buried single- and double shell tanks. Liquid waste recovered from the tanks will be pretreated to separate the low-activity fraction from the high-level and transuranic wastes. Vitrification is the leading option for immobilization of these wastes, expected to produce approximately 550,000 metric tons of Lowmore » Activity Waste (LAW) glass. This total tonnage, based on nominal Na{sub 2}O oxide loading of 20% by weight, is destined for disposal in a near-surface facility. Before disposal of the immobilized waste can proceed, the DOE must approve a performance assessment, a document that described the impacts, if any, of the disposal facility on public health and environmental resources. Studies have shown that release rates of radionuclides from the glass waste form by reaction with water determine the impacts of the disposal action more than any other independent parameter. This report describes the latest accomplishments in the development of a computational tool, Subsurface Transport Over Reactive Multiphases (STORM), Version 2, a general, coupled non-isothermal multiphase flow and reactive transport simulator. The underlying mathematics in STORM describe the rate of change of the solute concentrations of pore water in a variably saturated, non-isothermal porous medium, and the alteration of waste forms, packaging materials, backfill, and host rocks.« less
  • The U.S. Department of Energy must approve a performance assessment (PA) to support the design, construction, approval, and closure of disposal facilities for immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW) currently stored in underground tanks at Hanford, Washington. A critical component of the PA is to provide quantitative estimates of radionuclide release rates from the engineered portion of the disposal facilities. Computer simulations are essential for this purpose because impacts on groundwater resources must be projected to periods of 10,000 years and longer. The computer code selected for simulating the radionuclide release rates is the Subsurface Transport Over Reactive Multiphases (STORM) simulator. Themore » STORM simulator solves coupled conservation equations for component mass and energy that describe subsurface flow over aqueous and gas phases through variably saturated geologic media. The resulting flow fields are used to sequentially solve conservation equations for reactive aqueous phase transport through variably saturated geologic media. These conservation equations for component mass, energy, and solute mass are partial differential equations that mathematically describe flow and transport through porous media. The STORM simulator solves the governing-conservation equations and constitutive functions using numerical techniques for nonlinear systems. The partial differential equations governing thermal and fluid flow processes are solved by the integral volume finite difference method. These governing equations are solved simultaneously using Newton-Raphson iteration. The partial differential equations governing reactive solute transport are solved using either an operator split technique where geochemical reactions and solute transport are solved separately, or a fully coupled technique where these equations are solved simultaneously. The STORM simulator is written in the FORTRAN 77 language, following American National Standards Institute (ANSI) standards. The simulator utilizes a variable source code configuration that allows tailoring of the execution memory and speed to the specific problem by editing text parameter files and recompiling the code. Execution of the STORM simulator is controlled through a text input file. This input file uses a structured format of associated groups of input data. Input data files and results are also presented for model verification and example simulations. Appendix A to this report presents examples of the STORM Version 3.0 input data format for each of the groups. The STORM simulator may be compiled to run on any number of multiple, parallel processors. Calls to the Message Passing Interface (MPI) libraries have been written directly into the FORTRAN 77 code. Scripts for compiling and running on systems using the Linux operating system are provided in Chapter 6 of this report.« less
  • The emphasis of this work was on investigating the mechanisms and factors that control the recovery of heavy oil, with the objective to improve recovery efficiencies. For this purpose, the interaction of flow, transport and reaction at various scales (from the pore-network to the field scales) were studied. Particular mechanisms investigated included the onset of gas flow in foamy oil production and in in-situ steam drive, gravity drainage in steam process, the development of sustained combustion fronts and the propagation of foams in porous media. Analytical, computational and experimental methods were utilized to advance the state of the art inmore » heavy oil recovery. Successful completion of this research was expected to lead to improvements in the recovery efficiency of various heavy oil processes.« less
  • This report is an investigation of various multi-phase and multiscale transport and reaction processes associated with heavy oil recovery. The thrust areas of the project include the following: Internal drives, vapor-liquid flows, combustion and reaction processes, fluid displacements and the effect of instabilities and heterogeneities and the flow of fluids with yield stress. These find respective applications in foamy oils, the evolution of dissolved gas, internal steam drives, the mechanics of concurrent and countercurrent vapor-liquid flows, associated with thermal methods and steam injection, such as SAGD, the in-situ combustion, the upscaling of displacements in heterogeneous media and the flow ofmore » foams, Bingham plastics and heavy oils in porous media and the development of wormholes during cold production.« less