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Title: Big data analytics in the building industry

Abstract

Catalyzed by recent market, technology, and policy trends, energy data collection in the building industry is becoming more widespread. This wealth of information allows more data-driven decision-making by designers, commissioning agents, facilities staff, and energy service providers during the course of building design, operation and retrofit. The U.S. Department of Energy’s Building Performance Database (BPD) has taken advantage of this wealth of building asset- and energy-related data by collecting, cleansing, and standardizing data from across the U.S. on over 870,00 buildings, and is designed to support building benchmarking, energy efficiency project design, and buildings-related policy development with real-world data. Here, this article explores the promises and perils energy professionals are faced with when leveraging such tools, presenting example analyses for commercial and residential buildings, highlighting potential issues, and discussing solutions and best practices that will enable designers, operators and commissioning agents to make the most of ‘big data’ resources such as the BPD.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Energy Analysis & Environmental Impacts Division
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Building Technologies Office (EE-5B)
OSTI Identifier:
1344787
Report Number(s):
LBNL-1005983
Journal ID: ISSN 0001-2491; ir:1005983
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
ASHRAE Journal
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 58; Journal Issue: 7; Journal ID: ISSN 0001-2491
Publisher:
American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
97 MATHEMATICS AND COMPUTING; 32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; big data; building energy use

Citation Formats

Berger, Michael A., Mathew, Paul A., and Walter, Travis. Big data analytics in the building industry. United States: N. p., 2016. Web.
Berger, Michael A., Mathew, Paul A., & Walter, Travis. Big data analytics in the building industry. United States.
Berger, Michael A., Mathew, Paul A., and Walter, Travis. 2016. "Big data analytics in the building industry". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1344787.
@article{osti_1344787,
title = {Big data analytics in the building industry},
author = {Berger, Michael A. and Mathew, Paul A. and Walter, Travis},
abstractNote = {Catalyzed by recent market, technology, and policy trends, energy data collection in the building industry is becoming more widespread. This wealth of information allows more data-driven decision-making by designers, commissioning agents, facilities staff, and energy service providers during the course of building design, operation and retrofit. The U.S. Department of Energy’s Building Performance Database (BPD) has taken advantage of this wealth of building asset- and energy-related data by collecting, cleansing, and standardizing data from across the U.S. on over 870,00 buildings, and is designed to support building benchmarking, energy efficiency project design, and buildings-related policy development with real-world data. Here, this article explores the promises and perils energy professionals are faced with when leveraging such tools, presenting example analyses for commercial and residential buildings, highlighting potential issues, and discussing solutions and best practices that will enable designers, operators and commissioning agents to make the most of ‘big data’ resources such as the BPD.},
doi = {},
journal = {ASHRAE Journal},
number = 7,
volume = 58,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 7
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
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