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Title: A Framework for Daylighting Optimization in Whole Buildings with OpenStudio

Abstract

We present a toolkit and workflow for leveraging the OpenStudio (Guglielmetti et al. 2010) platform to perform daylighting analysis and optimization in a whole building energy modeling (BEM) context. We have re-implemented OpenStudio's integrated Radiance and EnergyPlus functionality as an OpenStudio Measure. The OpenStudio Radiance Measure works within the OpenStudio Application and Parametric Analysis Tool, as well as the OpenStudio Server large scale analysis framework, allowing a rigorous daylighting simulation to be performed on a single building model or potentially an entire population of programmatically generated models. The Radiance simulation results can automatically inform the broader building energy model, and provide dynamic daylight metrics as a basis for decision. Through introduction and example, this paper illustrates the utility of the OpenStudio building energy modeling platform to leverage existing simulation tools for integrated building energy performance simulation, daylighting analysis, and reportage.

Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Building Technologies Office (EE-5B)
OSTI Identifier:
1344767
Report Number(s):
NREL/CP-5500-68015
DOE Contract Number:
AC36-08GO28308
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Presented at the ASHRAE and IBPSA-USA SimBuild 2016 Building Performance Modeling Conference, 8-12 August 2016, Salt Lake City, Utah
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; OpenStudio; daylighting; building energy modeling; simulation

Citation Formats

None. A Framework for Daylighting Optimization in Whole Buildings with OpenStudio. United States: N. p., 2016. Web.
None. A Framework for Daylighting Optimization in Whole Buildings with OpenStudio. United States.
None. 2016. "A Framework for Daylighting Optimization in Whole Buildings with OpenStudio". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_1344767,
title = {A Framework for Daylighting Optimization in Whole Buildings with OpenStudio},
author = {None},
abstractNote = {We present a toolkit and workflow for leveraging the OpenStudio (Guglielmetti et al. 2010) platform to perform daylighting analysis and optimization in a whole building energy modeling (BEM) context. We have re-implemented OpenStudio's integrated Radiance and EnergyPlus functionality as an OpenStudio Measure. The OpenStudio Radiance Measure works within the OpenStudio Application and Parametric Analysis Tool, as well as the OpenStudio Server large scale analysis framework, allowing a rigorous daylighting simulation to be performed on a single building model or potentially an entire population of programmatically generated models. The Radiance simulation results can automatically inform the broader building energy model, and provide dynamic daylight metrics as a basis for decision. Through introduction and example, this paper illustrates the utility of the OpenStudio building energy modeling platform to leverage existing simulation tools for integrated building energy performance simulation, daylighting analysis, and reportage.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 8
}

Conference:
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