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Title: The Life Cycle of an OpenStudio Measure: Development, Testing, Distribution, and Application

Abstract

An OpenStudio Measure is a script that can manipulate an OpenStudio model and associated data to apply energy conservation measures (ECMs), run supplemental simulations, or visualize simulation results. The OpenStudio software development kit (SDK) and accessibility of the Ruby scripting language makes measure authorship accessible to both software developers and energy modelers. This paper discusses the life cycle of an OpenStudio Measure from development, testing, and distribution, to application.

Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)
OSTI Identifier:
1344766
Report Number(s):
NREL/CP-5500-68018
DOE Contract Number:
AC36-08GO28308
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Presented at the ASHRAE and IBPSA-USA SimBuild 2016 Building Performance Modeling Conference, 8-12 August 2016, Salt Lake City, Utah
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; OpenStudio; energy conservation measures; simulations

Citation Formats

None. The Life Cycle of an OpenStudio Measure: Development, Testing, Distribution, and Application. United States: N. p., 2016. Web.
None. The Life Cycle of an OpenStudio Measure: Development, Testing, Distribution, and Application. United States.
None. 2016. "The Life Cycle of an OpenStudio Measure: Development, Testing, Distribution, and Application". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_1344766,
title = {The Life Cycle of an OpenStudio Measure: Development, Testing, Distribution, and Application},
author = {None},
abstractNote = {An OpenStudio Measure is a script that can manipulate an OpenStudio model and associated data to apply energy conservation measures (ECMs), run supplemental simulations, or visualize simulation results. The OpenStudio software development kit (SDK) and accessibility of the Ruby scripting language makes measure authorship accessible to both software developers and energy modelers. This paper discusses the life cycle of an OpenStudio Measure from development, testing, and distribution, to application.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 8
}

Conference:
Other availability
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