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Title: DYNAMICS OF ATOMIC AND MOLECULAR EMISSION FEATURES FROM NANOSECOND, FEMTOSECOND LASER AND FILAMENT PRODUCED PLASMAS

Abstract

In this presentation, the persistence of atomic, and molecular emission features and its relation to fundamental properties (temperature and density) of ablation plumes generated using various irradiation methods (ns, fs, filaments) will be discussed in detail along with its implications for remote sensing applications.

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1344665
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-116602
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: IEEE International Conference on Plasma Science (ICOPS 2016), June 19-23, 2016, Banf, Canada
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
laser ablation (LA); Laser-produced plasma, plasma diagnostics, Molecular emission

Citation Formats

Harilal, Sivanandan S., Yeak, J., Brumfield, Brian E., and Phillips, Mark C.. DYNAMICS OF ATOMIC AND MOLECULAR EMISSION FEATURES FROM NANOSECOND, FEMTOSECOND LASER AND FILAMENT PRODUCED PLASMAS. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1109/PLASMA.2016.7534318.
Harilal, Sivanandan S., Yeak, J., Brumfield, Brian E., & Phillips, Mark C.. DYNAMICS OF ATOMIC AND MOLECULAR EMISSION FEATURES FROM NANOSECOND, FEMTOSECOND LASER AND FILAMENT PRODUCED PLASMAS. United States. doi:10.1109/PLASMA.2016.7534318.
Harilal, Sivanandan S., Yeak, J., Brumfield, Brian E., and Phillips, Mark C.. 2016. "DYNAMICS OF ATOMIC AND MOLECULAR EMISSION FEATURES FROM NANOSECOND, FEMTOSECOND LASER AND FILAMENT PRODUCED PLASMAS". United States. doi:10.1109/PLASMA.2016.7534318.
@article{osti_1344665,
title = {DYNAMICS OF ATOMIC AND MOLECULAR EMISSION FEATURES FROM NANOSECOND, FEMTOSECOND LASER AND FILAMENT PRODUCED PLASMAS},
author = {Harilal, Sivanandan S. and Yeak, J. and Brumfield, Brian E. and Phillips, Mark C.},
abstractNote = {In this presentation, the persistence of atomic, and molecular emission features and its relation to fundamental properties (temperature and density) of ablation plumes generated using various irradiation methods (ns, fs, filaments) will be discussed in detail along with its implications for remote sensing applications.},
doi = {10.1109/PLASMA.2016.7534318},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 8
}

Conference:
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  • The evolutionary paths of molecular species and nanoparticles in laser ablation plumes are not well understood due to the complexity of numerous physical processes that occur simultaneously in a transient laser-plasma system. It is well known that the emission features of ions, atoms, molecules and nanoparticles in a laser ablation plume strongly depend on the laser irradiation conditions. In this letter we report the temporal emission features of AlO molecules in plasmas generated using a nanosecond laser, a femtosecond laser and filaments generated from a femtosecond laser. Our results show that, at a fixed laser energy, the persistence of AlOmore » is found to be highest and lowest in ns and filament laser plasmas respectively while molecular species are formed at early times for both ultrashort pulse (fs and filament) generated plasmas. Analysis of the AlO emission band features show that the vibrational temperature of AlO decays rapidly in filament assisted laser ablation plumes.« less
  • We investigated the angular distribution of ions and atoms emanating from femto- and nanosecond laser-produced metal plasmas under similar laser fluence conditions. For producing plasmas, aluminum targets are ablated in vacuum employing pulses from a Ti:Sapphire ultrafast laser (40 fs, 800 nm) and an Nd:YAG laser (6 ns, 1064 nm). The angular distribution of ion emission as well as the kinetic energy distribution is characterized by a Faraday cup, while a quartz microbalance is used for evaluating deposited mass. The ion and deposited mass features showed that fs laser ablated plasmas produced higher kinetic energy and more mass per pulsemore » than ns plumes over all angles. The ion flux and kinetic energy studies show fs laser plasmas produce narrower angular distribution while ns laser plasmas provide narrower energy distribution.« less
  • The K-shell emission from flat and porous aluminum targets is used to infer the efficiency of creating a high temperature (>100eV), thermal plasma with 800 nm, 140 fs laser light. The K-shell emission from flat aluminum targets is fond to be significantly less than that of the porous targets, implying a lower temperature and less efficient coupling between the target and ultra-short pulse laser light.
  • Total reflected and scattered light measurements are used to define the net absorption for a 100 femtosecond, 400 nm laser pulse's interaction with a wide range of solid density target materials. Absorption is determined over the intensity range of 10[sup 13] to 10[sup 18] W/cm[sup 2]. This range is sufficiently broad to observe the transition in absorption from a low intensity region dominated by the cold material's electronic band structure, to an absorption at the highest intensities marked by a convergence to a nearly universal, material independent value. [copyright] 1994 [ital American] [ital Institute] [ital of] [ital Physics]
  • Li-like satellite emission recorded in experiments involving the irradiation of solid Al targets with ultra-short (100 [ital fs]), high intensity (10[sup 17] [ital W] [ital cm][sup [minus]2]) laser pulses show a peak-intensity distribution which is inconsistent with the results obtained from a stationary, NLTE intensity model. A fully time-dependent NLTE atomic kinetics model must be used to account for the observed satellite peak-intensity distribution. We also consider hot electrons effects on the population kinetics of doubly excited states. Detailed Stark broadened line profiles are employed to compute the synthetic spectra. [copyright] 1995 [ital American] [ital Institute] [ital of] [ital Physics]