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Title: Structural Evolution of Metals at High Temperature: Complementary Investigations with Neutron and Synchrotron Quantum Beams

Authors:
 [1]
  1. (Wollongong)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Advanced Photon Source (APS)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
1344570
Resource Type:
Book
Resource Relation:
Related Information: Magnesium Technology 2017
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
ENGLISH

Citation Formats

Liss, Klaus-Dieter. Structural Evolution of Metals at High Temperature: Complementary Investigations with Neutron and Synchrotron Quantum Beams. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1007/978-3-319-52392-7_87.
Liss, Klaus-Dieter. Structural Evolution of Metals at High Temperature: Complementary Investigations with Neutron and Synchrotron Quantum Beams. United States. doi:10.1007/978-3-319-52392-7_87.
Liss, Klaus-Dieter. Fri . "Structural Evolution of Metals at High Temperature: Complementary Investigations with Neutron and Synchrotron Quantum Beams". United States. doi:10.1007/978-3-319-52392-7_87.
@article{osti_1344570,
title = {Structural Evolution of Metals at High Temperature: Complementary Investigations with Neutron and Synchrotron Quantum Beams},
author = {Liss, Klaus-Dieter},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1007/978-3-319-52392-7_87},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Feb 24 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Fri Feb 24 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}

Book:
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