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Title: The influence of catalysts on biofuel life cycle analysis (LCA)

Abstract

Catalysts play an important role in biofuel production but are rarely included in biofuel life cycle analysis (LCA). In this work, we estimate the cradle-to-gate energy consumption and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions of Pt/γ-Al 2O 3, CoMo/γ-Al 2O 3, and ZSM-5, catalysts that could be used in processes to convert biomass to biofuels. We also consider the potential impacts of catalyst recovery and recycling. Integrating the energy and environmental impacts of CoMo/γ-Al 2O 3 and ZSM-5 into an LCA of renewable gasoline produced via in-situ and ex-situ fast pyrolysis of a blended woody feedstock revealed that the ZSM-5, with cradle-to-gate GHG emissions of 7.7 kg CO 2e/kg, could influence net life-cycle GHG emissions of the renewable gasoline (1.7 gCO 2e/MJ for the in-situ process, 1.2 gCO 2e/MJ for the ex-situ process) by up to 14% depending on the loading rate. CoMo/γ-Al 2O 3 had a greater GHG intensity (9.6 kg CO 2e/kg) than ZSM-5, however, it contributed approximately only 1% to the life-cycle GHG emissions of the renewable gasoline because of the small amount of this catalyst needed per kg of biofuel produced. As a result, given that catalysts can contribute significantly to biofuel life-cycle GHG emissions depending on themore » GHG intensity of their production and their consumption rates, biofuel LCAs should consider the potential influence of catalysts on LCA results.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [2];  [1]
  1. Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
  2. Eco Engineers, Des Moines, IA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE); Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO)
OSTI Identifier:
1344532
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1397482
Grant/Contract Number:
AC02-06CH11357
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Sustainable Materials and Technologies
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 11; Journal Issue: C; Journal ID: ISSN 2214-9937
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
09 BIOMASS FUELS; 59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; biofuels; catalyst production; fast pyrolysis; life cycle analysis; spent catalyst treatment

Citation Formats

Benavides, Pahola Thathiana, Cronauer, Donald C., Adom, Felix K., Wang, Zhichao, and Dunn, Jennifer B. The influence of catalysts on biofuel life cycle analysis (LCA). United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1016/j.susmat.2017.01.002.
Benavides, Pahola Thathiana, Cronauer, Donald C., Adom, Felix K., Wang, Zhichao, & Dunn, Jennifer B. The influence of catalysts on biofuel life cycle analysis (LCA). United States. doi:10.1016/j.susmat.2017.01.002.
Benavides, Pahola Thathiana, Cronauer, Donald C., Adom, Felix K., Wang, Zhichao, and Dunn, Jennifer B. Sat . "The influence of catalysts on biofuel life cycle analysis (LCA)". United States. doi:10.1016/j.susmat.2017.01.002. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1344532.
@article{osti_1344532,
title = {The influence of catalysts on biofuel life cycle analysis (LCA)},
author = {Benavides, Pahola Thathiana and Cronauer, Donald C. and Adom, Felix K. and Wang, Zhichao and Dunn, Jennifer B.},
abstractNote = {Catalysts play an important role in biofuel production but are rarely included in biofuel life cycle analysis (LCA). In this work, we estimate the cradle-to-gate energy consumption and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions of Pt/γ-Al2O3, CoMo/γ-Al2O3, and ZSM-5, catalysts that could be used in processes to convert biomass to biofuels. We also consider the potential impacts of catalyst recovery and recycling. Integrating the energy and environmental impacts of CoMo/γ-Al2O3 and ZSM-5 into an LCA of renewable gasoline produced via in-situ and ex-situ fast pyrolysis of a blended woody feedstock revealed that the ZSM-5, with cradle-to-gate GHG emissions of 7.7 kg CO2e/kg, could influence net life-cycle GHG emissions of the renewable gasoline (1.7 gCO2e/MJ for the in-situ process, 1.2 gCO2e/MJ for the ex-situ process) by up to 14% depending on the loading rate. CoMo/γ-Al2O3 had a greater GHG intensity (9.6 kg CO2e/kg) than ZSM-5, however, it contributed approximately only 1% to the life-cycle GHG emissions of the renewable gasoline because of the small amount of this catalyst needed per kg of biofuel produced. As a result, given that catalysts can contribute significantly to biofuel life-cycle GHG emissions depending on the GHG intensity of their production and their consumption rates, biofuel LCAs should consider the potential influence of catalysts on LCA results.},
doi = {10.1016/j.susmat.2017.01.002},
journal = {Sustainable Materials and Technologies},
number = C,
volume = 11,
place = {United States},
year = {Sat Jan 21 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Sat Jan 21 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}

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