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Title: (Metal) Bipolar Plate Testing

Abstract

No abstract provided.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [2];  [2];  [3];  [3];  [4];  [4]
  1. Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
  2. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
  3. Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
  4. National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE). Fuel Cell Technologies Program (EE-3F)
OSTI Identifier:
1344346
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-17-21245
DOE Contract Number:
AC52-06NA25396
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; Energy Sciences; Fuel Cell Bipolar Plate

Citation Formats

Borup, Rodney L., Mukundan, Rangachary, Rockward, Tommy, Brady, Mike, Thomson, Jeff, Papadias, Dionissios, Ahluwalia, Rajesh, Wang, Heli, and Turner, John. (Metal) Bipolar Plate Testing. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1344346.
Borup, Rodney L., Mukundan, Rangachary, Rockward, Tommy, Brady, Mike, Thomson, Jeff, Papadias, Dionissios, Ahluwalia, Rajesh, Wang, Heli, & Turner, John. (Metal) Bipolar Plate Testing. United States. doi:10.2172/1344346.
Borup, Rodney L., Mukundan, Rangachary, Rockward, Tommy, Brady, Mike, Thomson, Jeff, Papadias, Dionissios, Ahluwalia, Rajesh, Wang, Heli, and Turner, John. Thu . "(Metal) Bipolar Plate Testing". United States. doi:10.2172/1344346. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1344346.
@article{osti_1344346,
title = {(Metal) Bipolar Plate Testing},
author = {Borup, Rodney L. and Mukundan, Rangachary and Rockward, Tommy and Brady, Mike and Thomson, Jeff and Papadias, Dionissios and Ahluwalia, Rajesh and Wang, Heli and Turner, John},
abstractNote = {No abstract provided.},
doi = {10.2172/1344346},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Feb 16 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Thu Feb 16 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}

Technical Report:

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  • Advantages of implementation of power plants based on electrochemical reactions are successfully demonstrated in the USA and Japan. One of the msot promising types of fuel cells (FC) is a type of high temperature fuel cells. At present, thanks to the efforts of the leading countries that develop fuel cell technologies power plants on the basis of molten carbonate fuel cells (MCFC) and solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) are really close to commercialization. One of the problems that are to be solved for practical implementation of MCFC and SOFC is a problem of corrosion of metal components of stacks thatmore » are assembled of a number of fuel cells. One of the major components of MCFC and SOFC stacks is a bipolar separator plate (BSP) that performs several functions - it is separation of reactant gas flows sealing of the joints between fuel cells, and current collection from the surface of electrodes. The goal of Task 1 of the project is to develop new cost-effective nickel coatings for the Russian 20X23H18 steel for an MCFC bipolar separator plate using technological processes usually implemented to apply corrosion stable coatings onto the metal parts for products in the defense. There was planned the research on production of nickel coatings using different methods, first of all the galvanic one and the explosion cladding one. As a result of the works, 0.4 x 712 x 1296 mm plates coated with nickel on one side were to be made and passed to ANL. A line of 4 galvanic baths 600 liters was to be built for the galvanic coating applications. The goal of Task 2 of the project is the development of a new material of an MCFC bipolar separator plate with an upgraded corrosion stability, and development of a technology to produce cold roll sheets of this material the sizes of which will be 0.8 x 712x 1296 mm. As a result of these works, a pilot batch of the rolled material in sheets 0.8 x 712 x 1296 mm in size is to be made (in accordance with the norms and standards of the Russian metallurgical industry) and supplied to the partner for tests in a stack of fuel cells. A feasibility study on the cost of the Russian material for a BSP is to be done on Tasks 1, 2 in case the annual order makes up 400,000 sheets. The goal of Task 3 of the project is to research on possible implementation of cermet compositions on the basis of LiAlO{sub 2}, TiN, B{sub 4}C, ceramics with Ni and Ni-Mo binders. BaCeO{sub 3} conductive ceramics with metal binders of Ni, Ni-Cr etc. were also planned to be studied. As a result of these works, a pilot batch of samples is to be made and passed to FCE for tests. The goal of Task 4 of the Project is development of a new alloy or alloys with a ceramic coating that will have upgraded corrosion stability in operation within a SOFC. A new alloy was to be worked out by the way of modification of compositions of industrial alloys. Ceramic coatings are to be applied onto ferrite steel produced serially by iron and steel industry of Russia as sheet iron.« less
  • The Bipolar Plate (BP) Workshop was held at USCAR1 in Southfield, Michigan on February 14, 2017 and included 63 participants from industry, government agencies, universities, and national laboratories with expertise in the relevant fields. The objective of the workshop was to identify research and development (R&D) needs, in particular early-stage R&D, for bipolar plates for polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells for transportation applications. The focus of the workshop was on materials, manufacturing, and design aspects of bipolar plates with the goal of meeting DOE’s 2020 bipolar plate targets. Of special interest was the cost target of ≤$3/kW for themore » bipolar plate.« less
  • This report describes a 24-month effort in the development of a corrosion resistant hardware material for molten carbonate fuel cell (MFC) application. The objective of this program was to identify an inexpensive alloy for MCFC current collector/bipolar plate application. For this work, 310S was selected as the base alloy composition and La, Ce and Si were added to improve corrosion resistance. Eight candidate alloys, including 310S and 316L, were screened in MCFC anode and cathode atmospheres. The techniques used include isothermal corrosion, acoustic emission, thermal cycling corrosion, thermogravimetric analyses, electrical surface resistance, and dual atmosphere corrosion testing. Oxide scales formedmore » were analyzed by standard metallographic techniques. The results indicate that COLT-25+ and Crutemp-25 alloys (both containing 25Cr-25Ni and balance Fe) have the best corrosion resistance in the MCFC environment. Rare earth additives, La and Ce, do not appear to improve isothermal or thermal cycling resistance a great deal. Silicon addition appears to improve thermal cycling but not isothermal corrosion resistance. High Mn content (approx.18%) appears detrimental based on this limited investigation. Currently used 316L has the least corrosion resistance of all the alloys tested. Pressurized tests have shown that high pressure (10 atm) reduces corrosion rate in the anode atmosphere whereas it only slightly affects corrosion rate in the cathode atmosphere. 37 refs., 47 figs., 12 tabs.« less
  • The authors have identified a moldable graphite blend separator plate material, have molded complex shape bipolar separator plates, have tested the molded plate properties and function in single fuel cells, and have designed a conceptual rapid manufacturing line. In this quarter, the project received a three-month interim funding period to continue progress while the proposal is in DOE review. Thus, this fourth quarterly report is submitted in place of the originally scheduled final report for this project. All of the objectives of this project have been accomplished. Specifically, the electrical, chemical, and physical properties of the molded separator plates havemore » met or exceeded the DOE specifications. Performance and endurance tests of the molded plates in single cells have shown comparable performance to the state-of-art machined graphite separator plates. The DOE cost target of $10 per kW appears to be achievable with the low cost composite materials.« less
  • In the first year of this program, October 1, 1997 to September 30, 1998, the Institute of Gas Technology and its sub-contractors, Stimsonite Corporation and Superior Graphite Company have achieved the objectives to develop a low-cost molded bipolar plate and to design a conceptual mass production molding line. Specifically the authors have: identified low-cost materials for a moldable graphite blend separator plate; molded complex shape bipolar separator plates with fine details; met DOE target values for electrical, chemical, and physical properties; shown the molded plates comparable to machined graphite in single fuel cells; and designed a conceptual rapid manufacturing linemore » to manufacture the plates. All of the objectives in the first year of the project have been accomplished. The DOE cost target of $10 per kW appears to be achievable with the low cost composite materials. All of the critical electrical, chemical, and physical properties of the molded separator plates have met or exceeded the DOE specifications. Performance and endurance tests of the molded plates in single cells have shown comparable performance to state-of-art machined graphite separator plates. During this quarter, October 1 to December 31, 1998, with technical approval from DOE and 3-month interim funding, the authors made a transition to the new tasks of the continuation program. The major activities in this quarterly period have centered on the detailed specification, procurement, setup, and shakedown of equipment for a pilot production line to mold 5 plates per hour; and to make molds and provisions to test the performance and endurance of 5 and 10-cell fuel cell stacks made with the pilot-molded plates.« less