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Title: Advanced Chemical Design for Efficient Lignin Bioconversion

Abstract

Here, lignin depolymerization mainly involves redox reactions relying on the effective electron transfer. Even though electron mediators were previously used for delignification of paper pulp, no study has established a bioprocess to fragment and solubilize the lignin with an effective laccase–mediator system, in particular, for subsequent microbial bioconversion. Efficient lignin depolymerization was achieved by screening proper electron mediators with laccase to attain a nearly 6-fold increase of kraft lignin solubility compared to the control kraft lignin without laccase treatment. Chemical analysis suggested the release of a low molecular weight fraction of kraft lignin into the solution phase. Moreover, NMR analysis revealed that an efficient enzyme–mediator system can promote the lignin degradation. More importantly, the fundamental mechanisms guided the development of an efficient lignin bioconversion process, where solubilized lignin from laccase–HBT treatment served as a superior substrate for bioconversion by Rhodococcus opacus PD630. The cell growth was increased by 10 6 fold, and the lipid titer reached 1.02 g/L. Overall, the study has manifested that an efficient enzyme–mediator–microbial system can be exploited to establish a bioprocess to solubilize lignin, cleave lignin linkages, modify the structure, and produce substrates amenable to bioconversion.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ORCiD logo; ORCiD logo
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1344299
Grant/Contract Number:
AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
ACS Sustainable Chemistry & Engineering
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 5; Journal Issue: 3; Journal ID: ISSN 2168-0485
Publisher:
American Chemical Society (ACS)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; 37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL, AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; bioconversion; laccase−mediator−microbial; lignin; Rhodococcus; valorization

Citation Formats

Xie, Shangxian, Sun, Qining, Pu, Yunqiao, Lin, Furong, Sun, Su, Wang, Xin, Ragauskas, Arthur J., and Yuan, Joshua S. Advanced Chemical Design for Efficient Lignin Bioconversion. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1021/acssuschemeng.6b02401.
Xie, Shangxian, Sun, Qining, Pu, Yunqiao, Lin, Furong, Sun, Su, Wang, Xin, Ragauskas, Arthur J., & Yuan, Joshua S. Advanced Chemical Design for Efficient Lignin Bioconversion. United States. doi:10.1021/acssuschemeng.6b02401.
Xie, Shangxian, Sun, Qining, Pu, Yunqiao, Lin, Furong, Sun, Su, Wang, Xin, Ragauskas, Arthur J., and Yuan, Joshua S. Mon . "Advanced Chemical Design for Efficient Lignin Bioconversion". United States. doi:10.1021/acssuschemeng.6b02401. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1344299.
@article{osti_1344299,
title = {Advanced Chemical Design for Efficient Lignin Bioconversion},
author = {Xie, Shangxian and Sun, Qining and Pu, Yunqiao and Lin, Furong and Sun, Su and Wang, Xin and Ragauskas, Arthur J. and Yuan, Joshua S.},
abstractNote = {Here, lignin depolymerization mainly involves redox reactions relying on the effective electron transfer. Even though electron mediators were previously used for delignification of paper pulp, no study has established a bioprocess to fragment and solubilize the lignin with an effective laccase–mediator system, in particular, for subsequent microbial bioconversion. Efficient lignin depolymerization was achieved by screening proper electron mediators with laccase to attain a nearly 6-fold increase of kraft lignin solubility compared to the control kraft lignin without laccase treatment. Chemical analysis suggested the release of a low molecular weight fraction of kraft lignin into the solution phase. Moreover, NMR analysis revealed that an efficient enzyme–mediator system can promote the lignin degradation. More importantly, the fundamental mechanisms guided the development of an efficient lignin bioconversion process, where solubilized lignin from laccase–HBT treatment served as a superior substrate for bioconversion by Rhodococcus opacus PD630. The cell growth was increased by 106 fold, and the lipid titer reached 1.02 g/L. Overall, the study has manifested that an efficient enzyme–mediator–microbial system can be exploited to establish a bioprocess to solubilize lignin, cleave lignin linkages, modify the structure, and produce substrates amenable to bioconversion.},
doi = {10.1021/acssuschemeng.6b02401},
journal = {ACS Sustainable Chemistry & Engineering},
number = 3,
volume = 5,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 30 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Mon Jan 30 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}

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Cited by: 7works
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