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Title: Variations of soil microbial community structures beneath broadleaved forest trees in temperate and subtropical climate zones

Abstract

Global warming has shifted climate zones poleward or upward. Furthermore, understanding the responses and mechanism of microbial community structure and functions relevant to natural climate zone succession is challenged by the high complexity of microbial communities. Here, we examined soil microbial community in three broadleaved forests located in the Wulu Mountain (WLM, temperate climate), Funiu Mountain (FNM, at the border of temperate and subtropical climate zones), or Shennongjia Mountain (SNJ, subtropical climate). Although plant species richness decreased with latitudes, the microbial taxonomic α-diversity increased with latitudes, concomitant with increases in soil total and available nitrogen and phosphorus contents. Phylogenetic NRI (Net Relatedness Index) values increased from 0.718 in temperate zone (WLM) to 1.042 in subtropical zone (SNJ), showing a shift from over dispersion to clustering likely caused by environmental filtering such as low pH and nutrients. Similarly, taxonomybased association networks of subtropical forest samples were larger and tighter, suggesting clustering. In contrast, functional α-diversity was similar among three forests, but functional gene networks of the FNM forest significantly (P < 0.050) differed from the others. A significant correlation (R = 0.616, P < 0.001) between taxonomic and functional β-diversity was observed only in the FNM forest, suggesting low functional redundancymore » at the border of climate zones. Using a strategy of space-fortime substitution, we predict that poleward climate range shift will lead to decreased microbial taxonomic α-diversities in broadleaved forest.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [4];  [2];  [4];  [5];  [5];  [2];  [6];  [7];  [4]
  1. The Chinese Academy of Forestry, Beijing (China); Tsinghua Univ., Beijing (China)
  2. The Chinese Academy of Forestry, Beijing (China)
  3. The Chinese Academy of Forestry, Beijing (China); Central South Univ., Changsha (China); The Affiliated Hospital of Qingdao Univ., Qingdao (China)
  4. Tsinghua Univ., Beijing (China)
  5. Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States)
  6. Tsinghua Univ., Beijing (China); Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
  7. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1344292
Grant/Contract Number:
AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Frontiers in Microbiology
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 8; Journal ID: ISSN 1664-302X
Publisher:
Frontiers Research Foundation
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; microbial community; GeoChip; high-throughput seuqencing; broadleaved forests; soil biogeochemical process

Citation Formats

Yang, Sihang, Zhang, Yuguang, Cong, Jing, Wang, Mengmeng, Zhao, Mengxin, Lu, Hui, Xie, Changyi, Yang, Caiyun, Yuan, Tong, Li, Diqiang, Zhou, Jizhong, Gu, Baohua, and Yang, Yunfeng. Variations of soil microbial community structures beneath broadleaved forest trees in temperate and subtropical climate zones. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.3389/fmicb.2017.00200.
Yang, Sihang, Zhang, Yuguang, Cong, Jing, Wang, Mengmeng, Zhao, Mengxin, Lu, Hui, Xie, Changyi, Yang, Caiyun, Yuan, Tong, Li, Diqiang, Zhou, Jizhong, Gu, Baohua, & Yang, Yunfeng. Variations of soil microbial community structures beneath broadleaved forest trees in temperate and subtropical climate zones. United States. doi:10.3389/fmicb.2017.00200.
Yang, Sihang, Zhang, Yuguang, Cong, Jing, Wang, Mengmeng, Zhao, Mengxin, Lu, Hui, Xie, Changyi, Yang, Caiyun, Yuan, Tong, Li, Diqiang, Zhou, Jizhong, Gu, Baohua, and Yang, Yunfeng. Fri . "Variations of soil microbial community structures beneath broadleaved forest trees in temperate and subtropical climate zones". United States. doi:10.3389/fmicb.2017.00200. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1344292.
@article{osti_1344292,
title = {Variations of soil microbial community structures beneath broadleaved forest trees in temperate and subtropical climate zones},
author = {Yang, Sihang and Zhang, Yuguang and Cong, Jing and Wang, Mengmeng and Zhao, Mengxin and Lu, Hui and Xie, Changyi and Yang, Caiyun and Yuan, Tong and Li, Diqiang and Zhou, Jizhong and Gu, Baohua and Yang, Yunfeng},
abstractNote = {Global warming has shifted climate zones poleward or upward. Furthermore, understanding the responses and mechanism of microbial community structure and functions relevant to natural climate zone succession is challenged by the high complexity of microbial communities. Here, we examined soil microbial community in three broadleaved forests located in the Wulu Mountain (WLM, temperate climate), Funiu Mountain (FNM, at the border of temperate and subtropical climate zones), or Shennongjia Mountain (SNJ, subtropical climate). Although plant species richness decreased with latitudes, the microbial taxonomic α-diversity increased with latitudes, concomitant with increases in soil total and available nitrogen and phosphorus contents. Phylogenetic NRI (Net Relatedness Index) values increased from 0.718 in temperate zone (WLM) to 1.042 in subtropical zone (SNJ), showing a shift from over dispersion to clustering likely caused by environmental filtering such as low pH and nutrients. Similarly, taxonomybased association networks of subtropical forest samples were larger and tighter, suggesting clustering. In contrast, functional α-diversity was similar among three forests, but functional gene networks of the FNM forest significantly (P < 0.050) differed from the others. A significant correlation (R = 0.616, P < 0.001) between taxonomic and functional β-diversity was observed only in the FNM forest, suggesting low functional redundancy at the border of climate zones. Using a strategy of space-fortime substitution, we predict that poleward climate range shift will lead to decreased microbial taxonomic α-diversities in broadleaved forest.},
doi = {10.3389/fmicb.2017.00200},
journal = {Frontiers in Microbiology},
number = ,
volume = 8,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Feb 10 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Fri Feb 10 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}

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  • Microbial communities in soil A horizons derive their carbon from several potential sources: organic carbon (C) transported down from overlying litter and organic horizons, root-derived C, or soil organic matter. We took advantage of a multi-year experiment that manipulated the {sup 14}C isotope signature of surface leaf litter inputs in a temperate forest at the Oak Ridge Reservation, Tennessee, USA, to quantify the contribution of recent leaf litter C to microbial respiration and biomarkers in the underlying mineral soil. We observed no measurable difference (< {approx}40{per_thousand} given our current analytical methods) in the radiocarbon signatures of microbial phospholipid fatty acidsmore » (PLFA) isolated from the top 10 cm of mineral soil in plots that experienced 3 years of litterfall that differed in each year by {approx}750{per_thousand} between high-{sup 14}C and low-{sup 14}C treatments. Assuming any difference in {sup 14}C between the high- and low-{sup 14}C plots would reflect C derived from these manipulated litter additions, we estimate that <6% of the microbial C after 4 years was derived from the added 1-4-year-old surface litter. Large contributions of C from litter < 1 year (or >4 years) old (which fell after (or prior to) the manipulation and therefore did not differ between plots) are not supported because the {sup 14}C signatures of the PLFA compounds (averaging 200-220{per_thousand}) is much higher that of the 2004-5 leaf litter (115{per_thousand}) or pre-2000 litter. A mesocosm experiment further demonstrated that C leached from {sup 14}C-enriched surface litter or the O horizon was not a detectable C source in underlying mineral soil microbes during the first eight months after litter addition. Instead a decline in the {sup 14}C of PLFA over the mesocosm experiment likely reflected the loss of a pre-existing substrate not associated with added leaf litter. Measured PLFA {Delta}{sup 14}C signatures were higher than those measured in bulk mineral soil organic matter in our experiments, but fell within the range of {sup 14}C values measured in mineral soil roots. Together, our experiments suggest that root-derived C is the major (>60%) source of C for microbes in these temperate deciduous forest soils.« less
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